Posted on Leave a comment

Data Center Liquid Cooling – Is It Time for an Upgrade?

Featured image of a Liquid Cooling Data Center using immersion cooling

As the demand for cloud services, big data analytics and AI computations grows, data centers are housing increasingly dense and powerful computing equipment. This trend has led to higher heat loads, making efficient cooling not only desirable but necessary. In some situations, traditional air-cooled systems, once the backbone of data center cooling, are now being supplemented and even replaced by data center liquid cooling solutions.

In this article, we explore how far our cooling innovations have come and uncover the reality of today’s liquid cooling landscape. We’ll break down the tech news outlet hype around liquid-cooled data centers – what are the options? What makes it special? Is it suitable for every data center? And is this technological shift inevitable? Let’s dive in.

A Liquid Cooling Data Center using immersion cooling technology

Immersion Cooling Technology for Data Centers

Why is Liquid Cooling Superior?

Liquid cooling is superior in data centers due to its higher thermal conductivity – liquids conduct heat up to 1,000 times better than air – allowing it to efficiently remove heat directly from high-power computing components. 

This direct heat removal leads to significantly lower operational temperatures, enhancing the performance and longevity of sensitive electronic equipment. Additionally, liquid cooling systems are more energy-efficient than traditional air cooling, reducing operational costs and a creating a smaller carbon footprint.

Energy Savings

Another core benefit that liquid-cooled data centers enjoy is energy savings. In quantitative research conducted by NVIDIA and Vertiv, data centers that use liquid cooling systems reduced their total data center power consumption by 10.2% – an 18.1% reduction in facility power! From a financial perspective, this reduction is $740,000 less than from power-hungry data centers that consume $7.4 million annually.

Types of Data Center Liquid Cooling Systems

There are many data center liquid cooling systems in place – some more complex than others. However, these three are the most dominant ones in use today:

Direct-to-Chip Liquid Cooling

Direct-to-chip (D2C) cooling involves circulating a coolant directly over the heat-generating components, such as CPUs and GPUs. This method significantly increases cooling efficiency by removing heat directly at the source. D2C systems can use a variety of coolants, including water, dielectric fluids, or refrigerants, depending on the application’s needs and the desired cooling capacity.

Immersion Cooling

Immersion cooling takes liquid cooling a step further by submerging the entire server, or parts of it, in a non-conductive liquid. This technique is highly efficient as it ensures even and thorough heat absorption from all components. Immersion cooling is particularly beneficial for high-performance computing (HPC) and can dramatically reduce the space and energy required for cooling.

Rear-Door Heat Exchangers

Rear-door heat exchanger units are a hybrid solution, combining air and liquid cooling. These units are attached to the back of server racks, using a liquid-cooled coil to remove heat from the air exiting the servers. This method is often used as an intermediary.

Direct-to-Chip Liquid Cooling solution for CPU in a Data Center

Close-up view of Direct-to-Chip Liquid Cooling

Data Center Liquid Cooling Cons

“If liquid cooling is so great, why haven’t we implemented it in every data center?” you may be asking yourself. The answer is simple: we haven’t perfected the technology. There are still a number of cons that make this solution more of an option for massive data centers who are willing and can afford to take the risk.

Higher Initial Setup Cost

Implementing liquid cooling in data centers requires a substantial initial investment. This includes the cost of the cooling system itself, such as pumps, pipes, and liquid handling units, and potential modifications to the existing infrastructure to accommodate these new components.

Complex Maintenance Requirements

Liquid cooling systems are day-and-night more complex to maintain than traditional air cooling systems. They require regular monitoring for leaks, proper handling of the cooling liquids, and maintenance of additional components like pumps and liquid distribution systems, necessitating specialized skills and training (more initial expense). Moreover, modern servers that use denser equipment and computers require crane-system assistance for immersion cooling setups, which can be a massive infrastructure endeavor for data centers considering making the shift. 

Risk of Leaks and Liquid Damage

There is an inherent risk of leaks in any liquid cooling system, which can significantly damage expensive data center equipment. Ensuring leak-proof systems and having emergency response plans are essential, but they add to the operational complexity and costs.

Should Your Data Center Opt for Liquid Cooling Solutions?

Probably not. With the current tech and innovation, upgrading to a full liquid-cooled data center can be incredibly expensive with many unknowns. Even apart from its complexity and cost, there are no currently established standards for data centers to follow. However, we’re not saying that it’s a bad idea. 

Liquid cooling data centers have their place in the tech world, but it’s mainly for data centers ready to shell out billions of dollars. The ones eager to be at the forefront of the industry and pave the way for better big data analytics, AI computations, and cloud services. 

For edge computing and businesses requiring a more straightforward, more reliable solution – Modular Data Centers and All-in-One Data Center Cabinets can provide the same benefit without the hefty price tag. 

Are Liquid-Cooled Data Centers the Future 

Based on the current forecast, it looks like it. 

The global data center liquid cooling market is projected to grow from USD 2.6 billion in 2023 to USD 7.8 billion by 2028

But is it for every data center operator? Not at the moment. 

In the future, as more and more innovations come up, standards are created, and OEMs create more liquid-cooled-stable equipment, liquid cooling will become a more dominant cooling technology due to its efficiency and eco-friendliness. In the meantime, there are other ways you can increase airflowcontact us to find out more!

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/

Posted on 1 Comment

Optimizing Ethernet in Data Center Networks

Feature Ethernet Data Center Networks - AnD Cable Management Blog

Demand for faster data transfer, and more of it, has exploded exponentially over the last decade. Even before the pandemic, growth was already at exponential rates, but with the work from anywhere trend and more people gaming and streaming from home, demand rose even further. 

With it came an explosion in innovation, and a necessary one. Data Center Interconnects (DCI) Ethernet cable speeds increased from 100 Gb applications to 400 Gb and beyond. Server speeds have gone from 10 Gb to 25 Gb and beyond, with 100 Gb speeds on the horizon, and already in place in some data centers. 

The result is that data centers are now frequently operating like edge computing networks. Here is how it works. 

Ethernet Data Center Networks - AnD Cable Management Blog
Ethernet cable speeds have increased from 100 Gb applications to 400 Gb and beyond

Optimizing Ethernet in Data Centers

There are four factors in optimizing data center ethernet use: speed, power, reach, and latency. Speed is already being enhanced and optimized by the creation of better and more modern cable designs. But for the other areas, there is still work to be done. 

Power

When it comes to power, many data centers have gone green, with their own renewable energy sources. In most cases, they have access to all the power they need. The key is to use it in the most efficient way possible. With more power comes the issue of design, including hot and cold aisle design choices and more. 

Reach

Data center architecture must take a holistic approach, whether you are starting from scratch with a new data center or making moves and changes to update its current infrastructure. Everything from switches and routers to transceivers and overall physical design, reach must be weighed by efficiency vs. cost.

Latency

Finally, latency is related to the final user experience. When it comes to gaming or video conferencing, low latency is the expectation, while when conducting internet searches, it’s not as critical, but can still be an issue for users. As speed increases and fast becomes the norm, latency expectations change with it. 

These three areas are critical to how ethernet is used in data centers, but it is far from the only one. 

Definitive Guide to Understanding Ethernet Patch Cords in Modern Networks - AnD Cable Products Whitepaper
Ethernet cables differences, RJ45 Connectors and T586B vs T568A

Infrastructure Processing Units

How we manage this need for speed is changing on the hardware and software side of things as well. Infrastructure Processing Units (IPUs) run Software Defined Networking (SDN) programs away from the server core. This saves critical server bandwidth, but it comes with an additional load cost. 

As these advances develop, the demand for new and better ethernet cables arises. And as ethernet cables advance, IPUs hardware and software applications evolve as well. Both improve in sync with the other. It’s a developing relationship, but one data center manager’s must take advantage of. 

Edge Computing Centers 

One solution to speed is to move the data center closer to the end user. This has been a developing trend, but increasingly data centers are expanding to distributed models where the interconnections between resources drive both power and speed, creating a better overall experience for the end user, and reducing latency. 

This comes with challenges. As edge computing rapidly becomes the norm, that latency KPI gets lower and lower. Low latency is key, and specifically, DCI applications are critical to meeting new standards. Ethernet connections are a vital part of this change and growth.

The Need for Speed

What’s needed to make all of this work? The first is optical transceivers, which allow data centers to make reductions in the power they use, but enables them to increase bit rates at the same time. This allows for the increase of speed in the leaf-spine connections, a critical component in any data center, but especially those that are hyperscaling. 

This does not come without challenges, as not all ethernet cables are created equally, and interoperability can become an issue. 

To help with this, high-speed breakout cables are often used. These cables have one end that supports the aggregate rate and the other end is a series of disaggregated interfaces. With their speed comes performance challenges, especially over distances. However, there has been some rapid development in this area. 

The New Normal

As 400 Gb speeds become the norm and data centers are increasingly on the edge, there are many advantages. Distributed networks mean easier disaster recovery and backup planning and create the ability to use shared resources to meet shifting demands. 

However, this creates some challenges with testing and maintaining KPIs. Interoperability remains a key component of successful deployments. 

At AnD Cable Products, we understand these challenges. We offer everything your data center needs, from Zero U rack solutions to every type and style of cable you need. We can customize cables for your application, and offer a variety of other hardware solutions to meet your data center needs. When you are ready to upgrade your cables, make moves and changes, or even deploy a new data center or edge computing center, contact us. We’d love to be your partner in innovation

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/

Posted on Leave a comment

The Spaghetti Mess – Rack Cable Management Essentials

The Spaghetti Mess – Rack Cable Management Essentials - AnD Cable Management Blog

We often talk about the importance of network cable management in data centers, and how important it is to efficiency, airflow, equipment longevity, and more. But what about on managing cables on the rack itself? 

Jump to Section:

Do your racks have a ‘Spaghetti Mess’ of cables?

In fact, we know (because you’ve told us) that nearly everyone has encountered the “spaghetti mess” at some point or another. This is a bad thing, not just because of how it looks, but because of the possible damage, lack of efficiency, and even increased maintenance costs.

But there are solutions, and if you understand the essentials of rack cable management, things can be pretty simple for you. You don’t ever have to look at the “spaghetti mess” in your data center again. 

Let’s start at the beginning: 

The Server Rack Itself

First of all, we all know there are different kinds of racks and different sizes. While improving technology means some things are getting smaller, server components are actually getting larger. That means that wider racks, on the order of 23” cable racks or wider are more common. You can’t use a 19” cable rack for a 23” component. The end result will not only be ugly but could be disastrous.

In addition, racks, specifically in California but in other locations as well, must be built to withstand earthquakes and other natural disasters. It’s a pretty major requirement, and even if you aren’t in California, there may be state or local ordinances that cover the kind of racks you can use in your data center. The rack is the foundation for a good rack cable management system.

Racks also come in different levels of quality. Always remember that cheap is probably cheap for a reason. You want racks to not only be the right size, but to be sturdy and reliable. Cheap racks that bend, fit together poorly, and that don’t work well with standard adapters and rack cable managers will end up costing you more in the long run. Make sure you have the right rack for the right job. 

Rack Cable Managers

Rack cable managers, sometimes called horizontal lacing bars, are a critical part of cable management. There are a number of varieties, both horizontal and vertical. They are often classified by the amount of space they take up on the rack. 

Horizontal Zero U Cable Management Server Rack – 23″

For example, our ZeroU rack cable management systems doesn’t take up any rack space, allowing you to be more efficient with the use of your space, reducing the overall footprint of your servers. This means using fewer racks and leaving more space for airflow. 

A good rack cable management system also gives installers and maintenance personnel space to work. They have room to get tools and their hands in where needed, meaning they can work faster and more efficiently. 

Bundling and Labeling

Bundling like cables together keeps your racks looking neat, avoiding the spaghetti mess look. But it does more than that. Running like cables together reduces electromagnetic interference, makes finding what you are looking for easier, and again reduces maintenance time. 

Bundling can be done with zip ties, and while sometimes that is appropriate, most often Velcro is a better solution. It’s reusable, can be loosened or tightened as needed when doing adds, moves, and changes. 

The other important essential? Labeling. When was the last time you thought, “I wish I (or someone else) had labeled that?” When troubleshooting and executing repairs, a simple label can reduce the time needed to sort through cables exponentially. Also, if you properly and accurately label cables, you are less likely to forget where they should be terminated. They are less likely to get tangled as you install them, allowing you to avoid the spaghetti mess.

Cable Length and Rack Cable Management

Another simple way to avoid the Spaghetti mess? Be sure your cables are cut to the right length and terminate them appropriately. Network cables that are too long are much more likely to tangle or get wrapped around one another. 

The key is simply following the old carpenter’s rule: measure twice, cut once. You don’t want cables to be too short either. This can result in sharp bends and even breakage, and those things can result in data slowdowns or worse, failures. 

Have a Rack Cable Management Plan

What is the most important element of efficient rack cable management and avoiding the spaghetti mess? Having a plan and having everything on hand that you need. Whether you are renovating and updating your data center, building a new one, or replacing old components, develop a plan.

  • How Many? – Determine the size and number of racks you will need and order them ahead of time. 
  • Plan Ahead – Develop a plan to manage cables and order the horizontal rack organizers you will need – and vertical racks!
  • Network Cable Requirements – Determine the amount of cable and the type you will need. Order them ahead of time, but also make sure you have the terminals you will need on hand. 
  • Velcro! Need we say it again? – Make sure you have more than enough Velcro cable ties on hand to bundle cables as needed. 
  • Colored Zip Ties – While not always the best solution (see Velcro) overall, zip ties still have their place in rack cable management. Have plenty on hand to aid with cable routing. 
  • Cable Labels – have plenty of custom labels on hand and use them. Make sure every installer is on the same page as far as the way things will be labelled. 

A plan will keep the spaghetti mess from developing in the first place, saving you hours later on. 

Find a Dependable Partner

Not to brag, but AnD Cable is one of the most dependable in the industry. You want a partner with unparalleled customer service who responds quickly to your needs and can even offer custom solutions when needed. 

We’ve been working with data centers for years, and we’d be happy to be your partner whether you are updating your data center, building a new one, or simply need a long term supplier for whatever the future holds.

Get in touch and let us know how we can help you. We’re here to answer your questions. Avoid the spaghetti mess, but if you have one already, let us help you get things cleaned up. 

WHITEPAPER – Understanding Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring in Modern Networks

Understanding Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring in Modern Networks - AnD Cable Products Whitepaper

An overview of the differences between stranded and solid conductor wiring, the properties of each and the best cable type to use in a variety of typical settings.

  • Types of Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring
  • Comparison of Electrical Properties
  • Factors Impacting Attenuation / Insertion Loss
  • Choosing the Right Cable


About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

Posted on Leave a comment

How Cable Management and Airflow Management Impact Each Other in Data Centers

How Cable Management and Airflow Management Impact Each Other - Cable Management Blog

Here’s the simple truth of the matter. Cable management can impact airflow management , and airflow should definitely inform the method, type, and execution of cable management. To understand how the two impact each other and what the best overall solution will be for your data center, it is important for use to take a look at cable management and airflow from a high level perspective.

Jump to Section:

How Cable Management and Airflow Management Impact Each Other
Airflow is an Important Factor in Data Centers

The Goal of Airflow Management

So what is the goal of airflow management? The goals are twofold: preventing large variations in air temperature and air pressure. This means separating supply air mass and return air mass through design.

Just grouping cables together with a zip tie does nothing to facilitate this and can actually result in a serious disruption of airflow. What happens as a result? Lower fan efficiency, higher HVAC costs, potential changes in pressure, and even equipment damage or failure.

The current problem? Because more people are working from home or adopting the work from anywhere culture as a result of COVID, data centers are having to increase capacity, and they may not have additional floorspace to accommodate more server racks. Since conventional cable management can use up as much as 25% of rack space, this means that intelligently designed rack cable management is more important than ever.

Because of this it is important that cable management and airflow be looked at as an entire package. There are two areas of cable management in a data center: cable management in the room itself, essentially the cables that run between server racks, and rack cable management.

Cable Management in the Room

Of course, we must manage the cables that run between server racks, and they have to go somewhere. There are essentially two approaches, and both can create unique issues. They are running cables under the floor or running cables overhead.

Perhaps the most common is underfloor cabling where the underfloor space is also used for cool air transport. This is usually a very efficient method for separating supply and return air masses. However. When you put more holes in the floor, say to accommodate more server racks, the risk of “bypass air” or mixing the two airflows increases.

Why not just go with overhead cable management then? In some cases, this works exceptionally well, although there are budget and logistical obstacles. The height of the cable pathway is also often an issue.

Think of it this way. If your data center uses the underfloor space for air system management and not cable management, overhead pathways are fine. If they are placed too high though, the warm return air underneath can actually get too turbulent, resulting in a mix of the supply and return air. This created a temperature bypass.

But this bypass also can increase variations in pressure throughout the data center, causing the fans and other mechanisms to work harder. It’s a delicate balance.

Rack Cable Management

There are a lot of best practices and industry standards for airflow and cable management between servers, but often rack cable management falls into the “out of sight, out of mind” category. That’s a mistake, as cable management at this critical point can have a huge impact on airflow management.

While this seems like it should be common sense, the practice of good rack cable management seems to be hit or miss. As early as 2002, research done by Paul Artman, David Moss and Greg Bennett (Dell PowerEdge 1650: Rack Impacts on Cooling of High Density Servers) showed that poorly bundled cables, overloading cables on a horizontal lacing bar (particularly 1U configurations) could result in as much as a nine degree increase in component temperature.

This is a good argument for ZeroU rack cable managers and other more advanced techniques. Also, more data centers are moving to 23” or larger racks as opposed to the standard 19” racks, because equipment manufacturers are constantly increasing the computing power per U space. As a result there are more cables per rack. As cable bundles get larger, they also need more space between them to increase airflow.

For some components that possess a single fan intake side and hot-switchable components on the other, there is really only one path for cables to go. Careful cable management means not only ensuring that the fan intake is not blocked, but that there is an airflow egress as well. Often specialized chimney cabinets that allow air to enter both the front and the rear of the cabinet can be used for these applications.

The Effect of Poor Cable Management

Poor cable management, whether cables between server racks or rack cable management, will negatively impact airflow management. More than just the increased costs associated with HVAC systems, poor airflow can also lead to premature equipment and cable failures, overheating, and even increased downtime.

5 Ways Effective Cable Management Benefits Your Data Center - Cable Management Blog
A ‘Spaghetti Mess’ of cables blocks network rack airflow very effectively!

Since uptime is the most important metric to most data centers, cable management solutions need to be an integral part of any planned data center and prioritized expansion.

Devising a Comprehensive Solution

What’s the solution? The best path is to be proactive rather than reactive. Plan airflow management and cable management together as part of an overall data center plan. Be sure you and your staff have the right tools and materials. This not only includes the right racks and rack cable management tools like ZeroU rack managers and chimney racks where needed, but things like Velcro, wire tags, and even colored zip ties to keep things organized.

If you do have to do a sudden expansion due to increases in demands, bring in the whole team and listen to everyone’s ideas. Use industry best practices where possible, but understand that creative solutions and innovation may be necessary in extraordinary times.

Do you have questions about effective rack cable management, or do you need tools and supplies to get started? Contact us here at AnD Cable. We have the materials you need and the know how to help you select the best product for your situation.

WHITEPAPER – Understanding Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring in Modern Networks

Understanding Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring in Modern Networks - AnD Cable Products Whitepaper

An overview of the differences between stranded and solid conductor wiring, the properties of each and the best cable type to use in a variety of typical settings.

  • Types of Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring
  • Comparison of Electrical Properties
  • Factors Impacting Attenuation / Insertion Loss
  • Choosing the Right Cable


About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

Looking for other Cable Management Blogs? Top 5 Cable Management Blogs

Posted on Leave a comment

The Impact on Data Center Services – Before and After COVID

The Impact on Data Center Services - Before and After Covid - Cable Management Blog

The COVID pandemic has impacted nearly every industry, and while some have been impacted negatively, others are thriving. The key to all of these things is the ability to adapt. Nowhere is this truer than in data centers. The impact of COVID on data center services has been significant, and those in this “essential industry” can’t work remotely for the most part.

Jump to Section:

The Impact on Data Center Services - Before and After Covid - Cable Management Blog
The Impact on Data Center Services – Before and After Covid

The truth is, troubled industries like airlines, hotels, travel sites, and restaurants were not huge consumers anyway.

“The upside cases are actually higher than any of the drawdowns coming in from the troubled sectors,” said Sami Badri, Senior Equity Analyst at Credit Suisse said during a CAPRE presentation. “These troubled sectors were not big customers in the first place, whereas the newer industries that represent a large cash flow stream for data center services are flexing even larger than they ever have before. This is creating a new high-tide environment for demand for the overall tech sector.”

While the financial impact has been positive overall, it has created an increased demand, which has an direct impact on what data centers are and how they operate. What has that impact been, and what are data centers doing about it?

Increased Demand in Unusual Places

“Almost as soon as lockdown started,” David Issel, the asset manager at a Comcast data center known as a “headend” told us, “this place was running at 95%. Fans and our HVAC system was at capacity.”

The Work from Home or rather Work from Anywhere demands of COVID have increased the need for residential reliability and speed on a larger scale. What was evenings of surfing and streaming are now days filled with workers tethered to their home offices, computers, standing desks, and dependent on their routers and home WiFi in ways we never would have thought of in January of 2020.

Data Centers Services have been quick to respond and increase capacity. “Even though the components are getting smaller, the units themselves are getting larger,” Issel told us. “We’re using 23” racks instead of 19” racks, and that means it’s more important than ever to conserve space.”

The other issue? It takes people to add hardware and capacity to a data center, but only so many people can be present in the facility and still remain socially distanced and adhering to mask requirements. Keeping employees safe is a top priority.

Changing Attitude in Lagging Industries

“Some industries have never been well architected to handle work from home or organize a virtual workforce,” Badri told us. “Three of those sectors are healthcare, government and education. We’ve been hearing that government IT spending pledges alone are up more than 20 percent. Education budgets are also increasing and shifting up. Other categories playing catch-up include healthcare, which has been a very big pain point for the U.S.”

This includes things like telemedicine, schools that are either operating 100% virtually or at least offering distance options to students and parents alike. Higher education is struggling the most, as universities train staff, shift to online platforms, and prepare for an entirely new education platform.

While even the Federal government has been lagging in using technology, local, regional, and state governments find themselves even further behind. The question is whether these industries will continue to advance digitally or whether, as the impact of COVID inevitably recedes, the demand will recede with it.

The Need for Speed

Consumers and others often confuse bandwidth and speed. However, there is a need for both, as more people are online at the same time than under normal circumstances. This is bandwidth, or the capacity of the network to handle volume.

Speed is about how fast data can be delivered. Both are vital for consumers. Imagine a neighborhood populated with day traders whose income can be impacted by millisecond delays. That same neighborhood might be filled with school children doing school work online during work hours.

For data centers and companies like Comcast and other internet providers, it is about the ability to scale. “We’ve got plans for getting ahead, and we’re working on expanding HVAC and capacity,” David Issel told us about his particular headend.

This need for speed may mean that new data centers and headends need to be built in order for companies to keep up.

Coming 5G and Other Advancements

A digital revolution and a move to more remote operations, companies like Zoom, Slack, and other communication platforms were things many thought would take years to manifest. Due to COVID, this digital revolution has manifested in months instead.

But there was already a revolution on the horizon. The 5G and IoT revolution was already putting pressure on data centers to adapt and be ready for a new, faster normal. 5G is about more than just speed though. It makes a data center more flexible in more ways.

“The flexibility includes things such as the desegregation of the control and user plains of the network and also migration towards distributed baseband processing and the radio access network (RAN). In turn, this leads to opportunities for virtualization of RAN network functions and it enables the convergence of the RAN into the data center space,” Mike Wolfe, Vice President of Wireless Network Engineering at CommScope explained in a recent DCD article, How 5G will Affect the Structure of Data Centers?

“What this means is there could be a lot of smaller data centers, distributed geographically in such a way that’s going to make them a little bit more difficult to manage. Connectivity will be important in terms of how we do that,” Jamie Birdnow, also of CommScope shared in the webinar.

While it is safe to say that data center services will require huge changes to accommodate and enable 5G, there is still a lot that is unknown.

For example, we don’t know is how applications are likely to develop over a number of. Some things will not evolve as expected, and there are surprises. Autonomous cars will require far more sophistication than remote surgeries.

The key is to understand that data centers were already in a state of change, and the COVID crisis has only accelerated that.

The Bottom Line in Data Center Services

The data center industry has experienced a focus shift due to COVID, and as with any revolution during a crisis, it comes with challenges. That means the efficient use of space, the expansion of capacity more rapidly than planned, and employing other techniques to “future proof” data center services.

Virtual connectivity is a must,” Badri told us. “It’s no longer a debate. It’s now a case of survival and relevance and productivity. You’re starting to see permanent shifts.”

That speaks back to David Issel and Comcast, not only scrambling to catch up and expand, but to prepare for whatever tomorrow may bring.

A key to Issel’s success is his partnership with Louis and AnD Cable Products. Not only does his data center depend on their products and reliability, but they’ve also worked together to create custom hardware that is “perfect for the application,” Issel told us.

It’s these types of cooperation and efficiency, like the ZeroU Horizontal Cable Managers AnD Cable Products offers, which allow technicians to work more easily, increase the life of cables, and more.

If you want to “future proof” your data center services and you are looking for a physical hardware supplier that will be there for you as you expand and adapt, contact us at AnD Cable Products today. We’d love to talk about how we can best work together.


About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

Looking for Blogs on Co-Location? Top 10 Colocation Blogs

Posted on 1 Comment

Using Data Center IoT to Automate and Improve Operational Efficiency

Using IoT Improve Data Center Operational Efficiency - Cable Management Blog

In order to meet demand, data centers are facing the need for physical expansion of their capabilities, such as the addition of new server racks, greater capacity HVAC systems and more. The problem is that those needing to making physical changes cannot do so remotely. Fortunately, there is a solution, which combines traditional data center infrastructure management (DCIM) with the application of the Internet of Things (IoT). Once implemented, data center IoT can help minimize the need for on site interventions, reduce costs and enable better data collection.

Jump to section:

Using IoT Improve Data Center Operational Efficiency - Cable Management Blog

The Case for Data Center Automation Grows Stronger

Data centers face a number of unique challenges at the moment. Those that were operating at 75-80% capacity prior to COVID-19 have suddenly found themselves operating at 95% thanks to widespread work from home requirements driving a jump in demand. Not only do data centers need to meet current demand levels, with continuing uncertainty around when things will ‘get back to normal,’ the need to consistently deliver over an extended period of time.

In order to physically expand however, Technicians need to be on site, installing new server racks, horizontal cable management racks, additional cabling, and maximizing data center floor space. And they have to do all this while maintaining social distancing, wearing masks, and protecting the health of every essential worker who needs to be on site.

Enter DCIM and the Internet of Things (IoT). IoT is the first real application of using operational technology towards data center automation. The idea is to implement monitoring and repair solutions with minimal human intervention after the initial installation. What does this look like?

Using IoT to Drive Automation

The Internet of Things is in the driver’s seat when it comes to changes in DCIM. IoT Devices are cheaper to create and install. Wired monitors are more difficult to deploy, generally cost more, and lack the efficiency of wireless monitoring devices. To your bottom line, data center IoT devices can collect more data from numerous locations and end points for less cost.

Also, since they are wireless, IoT devices can be monitored from anywhere. But that’s not all. Even pre-COVID there was a growting trend towards data center automation, remote access and management. More data means better predictive analytics when it comes to future maintenance needs and even setups for self-healing infrastructure.

It’s critical that as much data as possible is gathered, collected, and controlled correctly, and those tasks are perfectly suited for IoT solutions. The more data center automation that is already in use, the less it will cost to upgrade to a more robust monitoring system.

This is where the maturity of the DCIM comes in: the more up to date the DCIM, the easier it is to keep current. But it’s not just about the IoT and devices. You still need skilled people at the heart of it – automation doesn’t catch everything. But that being said, there are at least three areas where implementation of data center IoT will save you money.

Potential Cost Savings

Where will cost savings come in to play? There are essentially three areas:

  • The monitoring of air flow, HVAC, and utilization of space – More on this in a moment.
  • Resiliency systems, like UPS systems – Individual batteries can fail or require too much electricity to maintain a charge and degrade system performance on backup power.
  • The human element – While you need skilled people to deploy and analyze data, the disruption of HVAC equilibrium and additional space needs can be offset by remote monitoring.

Some changes are so subtle, they won’t be caught by human monitoring anyway, particularly battery performance and other issues. Without integrating a data center IoT you might not even know there is a problem unless you are specifically looking for it.

The Effect of the Physical Layer on IoT

Is system management new? No. But there are new ways to manage passive assets like HVAC that make data centers more efficient and profitable. But in addition, there are two camps of thought about the data center, and the IoT can help bridge that gap.

The data center itself often falls under facilities management. That team is concerned with physical security, power usage, fire suppression and more. The IT department, on the other hand, wants the data center to deliver data and services, and do it quickly. The facilities side may not be monitoring data performance, and the IT side may not be considering power management at all.

This is where the IoT shines. Remote systems monitoring allows facilities management to see the impact changes they make may have on overall performance, and the IT department can see the limitations of the physical layer, and make data driven decisions about usage and proposed changes.

Components of a Good Physical Layer Monitoring System

Many DCIM systems are designed by the IT side of the data center and lack the robust physical layer monitoring that is necessary in a modern data center. What makes a good physical layer monitoring system? There are several factors involved.

  • 100% Wireless – A wireless system that can monitor hundreds of sensors simultaneously will work for even large data center environments
  • Real-time Monitoring and Event Storage – Real-time, user set alarms and alerts and event storage on the cloud for later analysis
  • Low-Maintenance IoT Devices – Small, maintenance-free devices with long battery life
  • 3-D Visualizations – That allow effective monitoring with no infrastructure changes
  • Energy-Reducing System – Allowing data centers to save more than 20% on power usage

A good system will have custom data center IoT devices and sensing probes available for specific use, and a cloud server where data can be easily accessed, analyzed, and managed.

Want to compliment your current DCIM or looking to upgrade or install a new one? Contact us about the A150 System, which includes all of the components and cloud services like those mentioned above. We’d love to talk about how we can help you make your data center more profitable through this innovative data center automation technology.

Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control

A150 Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control System Brochure

Full visibility, network security and control of your physical layer environment. Monitor your entire hybrid cloud and IT infrastructure from a cloud-based, integrated dashboard:

  • Introducing the A150 System
  • A150 System Architecture – High-Level Overview
  • A150 System Features
  • System Controller Hardware and Specifications
  • Monitoring Controllers, Probes and Sensors

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/