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Edge Computing – A Contrast to Colocation

Featured image of edge computing server cabinets

Edge computing is an innovative strategy that moves data storage and processing closer to users and data sources. On the contrary, colocation utilizes a third party’s centralized area and data to share resources and space with our clients. Although it may appear that location differentiates the two, there are still many other distinctions that make them suitable for different uses and needs. 

In 2025, the world’s data creation is forecast to hit a new record high of over 180 zettabytes. Of course, this will inevitably increase the demand for low-latency and high-bandwidth applications. As a result, it paved the way for new and improved data processing paradigms like edge colocation. As the name implies, it combines the best of edge computing and colocation to address the drawbacks of both and provide a better and more convenient solution to customer needs. 

Rows of server cabinets used for Edge Colocation

What Is Edge Computing

Edge computing is a method that places data processing and storage at the network’s “edge,” where it’s closer to both resources and users. Since discovering the “edge,” edge computing has become a vital modern technology. After years of relying on huge rooms as centralized data centers, edge computing decentralized the processing across multiple edge nodes or devices to create local networks and servers. Since then, it has provided numerous functions and solutions to a wide range of users. 

Because it reduces the distance between data sources and users, edge computing has a faster response time, less bandwidth consumption, better security, and many other benefits. Since it processes data on-site, it’s highly reliable, provides real-time data, works efficiently on on-demand applications, and more.

Read Specific Use Cases for Edge Computing

Advantages of Edge Computing

Edge computing offers several benefits that make it an attractive and valuable approach in today’s digital landscape:

Reduced Latency

Edge computing reduces data transmission latency to centralized data centers by processing data closer to the source or end-users. This reduction in latency is critical for applications that require real-time data processing, such as autonomous vehicles, industrial automation, and immersive virtual reality experiences.

Improved Performance

Because data processing occurs locally, performance and response times improve, enhancing the overall user experience and allowing time-sensitive applications to function smoothly.

Bandwidth Optimization

By processing and filtering data at the edge, edge computing helps optimize bandwidth usage. The central cloud or data center receives only relevant or summarized data, reducing network traffic. As a result, it saves bandwidth and minimizes the costs associated with data transmission.

Enhanced Reliability

Edge computing improves reliability by reducing reliance on centralized data centers. This function guarantees the continuity of data processing during connection or network failures. Hence, edge computing is particularly essential for mission-critical applications that cannot afford any downtime.

Scalability and Flexibility

Edge computing makes it possible to scale applications efficiently as demand changes. This means that services and applications can be changed at the network edge without requiring significant infrastructure changes for the company.

These advantages of edge computing make it a compelling solution for various applications and industries. In today’s data-driven, interconnected world, edge computing can open new doors, boost efficiency, and improve user experiences.

Person looking at graph with edge computing text overlay

Use Cases for Edge Computing

Edge computing has been beneficial to many use cases, such as the following:

  • Autonomous or Self-driving Cars

Edge computing allows real-time data processing from the vehicle’s sensors. As a result, it enables cars to process information quickly, allowing them to avoid obstacles, make decisions, and navigate autonomously. 

  • Healthcare

It allows accurate data collection and processing from medical devices in real time. Additionally, it’s essential for medical devices that must monitor a patient continuously and aren’t reliant on network connectivity. Furthermore, edge computing can improve healthcare services in rural and remote areas by allowing faster access to patient information, diagnosis, and treatment. 

  • Manufacturing and Industrial

Edge computing can also improve efficiency and productivity in factories and industrial settings. It monitors operations, controls equipment and machines, and performs other real-time tasks. It’s also useful for energy efficiency monitoring, predictive maintenance, and more. 

  • Retail

It is also helpful in processing retail sensors and other applications, allowing faster and more accurate inventory management, better customer service, and even loss or fraud detection. 

  • Human Resources (HR)

Edge computing offers numerous advantageous use cases for Human Resources (HR) departments across various industries. One prominent use case is the integration of edge devices and sensors in the workplace to gather real-time data on employee attendance, well-being, and safety.

Edge computing also makes security more robust for organizations, reducing the amount of data transmitted and processed in the cloud. That means sensitive data are less vulnerable to attacks. HR departments from established companies can deploy more secure tools exclusive to the organization for employee queries, performance, and requests. 

  • Universities

Edge computing enhances a university’s capabilities in processing and analyzing large volumes of data significantly faster. For academic researchers and doctoral students, this means more frequent breakthroughs and innovation.

Edge computing also enhances Internet of Things (IoT) capabilities. By installing servers closer to devices, they can perform better. End users will experience reduced latency, while universities will benefit from less bandwidth consumption.  

Edge computing has become a significant part of many businesses and industries by processing data from sensors, cameras, machines, smart devices, etc. 

What Underlying Concept Is Edge Computing Based On

Edge computing is based on the concept of distributed computing. The idea is that instead of a centralized data center or central cloud, it distributes data processing and storage across multiple devices. Edge computing processes data closer to the “edge,” where the users and sources are. Since it’s not reliant on a central cloud for data processing, it reduces the number of “hops” the data must travel. As a result, it saves on bandwidth, makes real-time responses, performs better, and can function independently even with a poor network connection.

What Is Colocation

Colocation is the method of renting a space from a third-party colocation data center facility. It gives you access to the facility’s resources, infrastructure, and services other renters share. Colocation can be a more cost-effective and secure option than building and maintaining your data center. 

What Is a Colocation Data Center

Colocation data centers are huge facilities that house servers and resources many users share. These centers offer physical security, hardware maintenance, storage, servers, and other efficiency resources. Typically, space is rented per rack, room, cabinet, or area unit. Many companies and businesses prefer colocation, particularly if they need space to house the equipment and wish to avoid the hassle of maintaining network servers and infrastructure. 

Advantages of Colocation

Colocation has several advantages that make it ideal for many companies, such as:

Space and Lower Expenditure Costs

Of course, the most appealing colocation assets are space and cost savings. Whether you’re a startup, a small business, or a large corporation, space is valuable. Colocation provides space and security, power systems, cooling, etc., so you can save on overhead expenses.

Scalability and Flexibility

Because you can easily rent more space and add more applications, scaling as your business expands is also convenient.

Skilled Staff and Maintenance

Experts and personnel in data centers can help monitor and maintain hardware, equipment, and other systems to ensure everything runs at peak performance. 

Better Security

Security personnel can ensure that no one comes into contact with any of the company’s sensitive information or data. Furthermore, experts in data centers can also help design applications and network security to help manage risks and other cyber threats. 

Colocation is becoming a more popular option for businesses of all sizes – not just giant organizations. It’s a great choice if you’re looking for a cost-effective, secure, and scalable way to host your data and applications. 

Use Cases for Colocation

Colocation is excellent for small businesses and large corporations requiring space and security for their tech infrastructure. Here are a few use cases that work well with colocation

  • Financial institutions

Financial institutions, such as banks that need an extra level of security benefit from colocation. Physical security and expert risk managers help protect clients’ personal information and the company’s assets.

  • E-commerce

Online businesses can thrive with strong connectivity without building additional infrastructure, cutting costs, and saving space. 

  •  Technology Companies

Many tech companies also use colocation to house high-powered hardware and other applications that require reliability and security. 

As the digital world expands and the need for connectivity of resources becomes more valuable, colocation will undoubtedly play a significant part in the future and evolution of data centers. 

Key Differences Between Edge Computing and Colocation

Edge computing and colocation have many key differences. Here are some of them:

Edge ComputingColocation 
Location and Proximity to End-UsersCloser to the end-usersA separate and distant area away from the end-user
Infrastructure and HardwareSmaller, more distributed data units or devices

Hardware is smaller, more efficient, and can be moved anywhere
Large and centralized data centers

More extensive and powerful hardware that can handle big operations shared by multiple users
Scalability and FlexibilityScalable as you can add resource requirements based on business needs

Flexible because it can be used to support a wide variety of applications
Also scalable since you can simply rent more or less space Also flexible because you can customize it on demand

Biggest difference is that colocation data centers can handle massive upgrades
Cost and MaintenanceTypically more expensive since it requires specialized hardware and software to process on the “edge”

Regular maintenance and updates can also be costly
It can be less expensive as multiple users can share maintenance costs

Users only pay for bandwidth and resources that they need
Best forApplications that require real-time processingApplications that require high availability and depends more on data storage than dynamic processing

What Is Edge Colocation

Simply put, edge colocation is edge computing implemented through colocation. It’s a combination of strategically located data centers and high-performance systems. Its edge data centers have eliminated the need for businesses to construct new facilities for their edge computing needs and have it handled by a third-party organization that offers colocation and edge computing services. Additionally, since the data travels a shorter distance because these data centers are located close to the end user, performance is also better and more efficient. 

Black colocation server cabinets that are edge ready

What Is an Edge Data Center

Edge data centers are smaller “colocation” facilities located closer to the network’s edge. An edge colocation data center is a type of edge data center that provides faster content delivery with minimal latency because it is located close to the population it serves. 

When choosing a data center, there are several factors you should consider aside from location, such as:


Save Thousands and Generate Millions in Revenue

For data centers, on the other hand, one way to ensure savings and smarter hardware expansion and footprint usage is to use optimization devices. One that allows your data center engineers to use all of your server rack units (RU) is through a Zero U Cable Manager

This server rack cabinet management tool allows you to replace the traditional 1RU or 2RU cable managers that use unnecessary space. For already established data centers, you can recover up to 30% of your rack units by installing a Horizontal Zero U Cable Management Shelf. That means you get to free one whole server rack cabinet for every three optimized cabinets to secure more storage, switches, and other devices without paying thousands of dollars. 

For edge colocation data centers where floor space management is paramount, Zero U cable managers are no longer a “nice-to-have” upgrade but a necessity. 

Side-by-side comparison of 1U and Zero U cable manager

Who Is Edge Colocation For

Edge colocation can be an exceptional option for companies that need high-performance applications or services for many users in a particular area or region. It can benefit organizations and industries looking to enhance their software and services’ efficiency, security, reliability, and cost-effectiveness.

Use Cases of Edge Colocation

Here are some use cases that benefit from edge colocation:

  • Telecom

As we move to 5G, there is a greater opportunity to place network function virtualization (NFV) nodes further from antennas while keeping base stations near their communities. Instead of building a bigger server in one location, they can cut costs by creating smaller servers and distributing them to different areas. 

  • Bare-metal Services 

Meta’s bare metal offerings on edge colocation allow applications and services to run on physical servers at the network’s edge at a lower cost because you can rent space or pay by the hour. Edge colocation can offer high performance, flexibility, and more control.

  • Virtual Machines (VMs) or Containers

Edge colocation’s reduced latency, better connectivity, improved security, rapid scaling, and portability can benefit high-powered VMs and containers. For example, a gaming company could use edge colocation to host its game servers closer to end users. Of course, it’s expected to result in better connectivity and performance.  

Edge colocation is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years due to the increased use of the IoT, 5G, and the demand for greater security. 

Data Center Companies

There are already a growing number of data center companies worldwide. Here are some of the leading names:

  • Digital Realty

Another leading data center and cloud solution provider, it has a global footprint that connects over 310+ data centers across 25+ countries.

  • Equinix

Equinix is another global leader in data center and colocation services for enterprise networks and cloud computing. It has 248 data centers in 27 countries on five continents. 

  • NTT Communications

NTT Communications is a global provider of cloud, managed data center services, and IT solutions. They have over 200 data centers in 70 markets across the Americas, Europe, and Asia.

These are just some of the many data center companies around. When selecting an edge data center provider, it is critical to consider your specific company’s needs and requirements.

Should Your Organization Use Edge Colocation Services

As the amount of data used and created at the edge boosts, colocation at the edge is becoming increasingly crucial. Selecting the right data center is crucial if you think edge colocation will benefit your company. You also need the right equipment and configuration to maximize efficiency and space in the data center. 

Data Center Cabinets

The 5G revolution, Edge Computing and the demand for Distributed Data requires data centers to become greater in capacity and ability. This simultaneously increases the complexity and difficulty in managing the data center infrastructure.

The amount of data centers required for processing the exponentially increasing amounts of data for streaming, Al, AR and the Internet of Things (IoT) also puts a greater demand on capital expenditures. Companies must scale upwards quickly but efficiently with an eye on both performance and economy. lT executives are given a seemingly impossible task to expand services, improve efficiencies, manage the growth and stay within an already stretched budget.

All-in-One IT Cabinet by Rakworx with text overlay showing  benefits

Modular Data Center Solutions

In addition to precisely prefabricated, modular structures and components, these high-quality Modular Data Centers efficiently utilize natural air and an evaporative cooling system to help maximize productivity from the lT infrastructure. Intelligent power distribution systems help self-monitor and regulate all activities within the structure.

Find out more about Modular Data Centers

At AnD Cable Products, we understand these challenges. We offer everything your data center needs, from Zero U Rack Solutions to every type and style of cable you need. We can customize cables for your application and offer various other hardware solutions to help your business succeed and grow. When you are ready to upgrade your cables, make moves and changes, or even deploy a new colocation or edge colocation data center or edge computing center – contact us at (800) 394-3008 or click HERE for a FREE 30-day TRIAL of our Zero U Cable Managers.

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/

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Optimize Your Data Center for a Potential Downturn – Doing More With Less

Feature Optimize Your Data Center for a Potential Downturn - Doing More With Less - AnD Cable Management Blog

With every recession, companies make valiant attempts to reduce their spending. One of the first things to go is marketing. Then the C-Suite starts to look for other potential savings, including in the area of servers and data management. But the need to process and analyze data, access the internet, and other tasks doesn’t go away. To be competitive, data centers also need to cut costs, and find ways to do more with less. 

Sometimes this involves moves and changes that, while they cost time and even money to implement in the short term, will result in later gains in the long term. Let’s look at some strategies that can help optimize your data center.

Optimize Your Data Center for a Potential Downturn - Doing More With Less - AnD Cable Management Blog
To be competitive, data centers also need to cut costs, and find ways to do more with less. Learn strategies to optimize your data center.

Optimize Server Configurations 

One of the best ways to cut costs is to optimize your server configurations. Servers will use less floorspace, giving you room to add new servers in the same number of square feet. 

How do you do this? Well, first you start by replacing your existing Cable Management racks, with Horizontal Zero U Cable Management Racks. This unique design is used to mount ZeroU Cable Managers in the same U space as the active component, replacing conventional 1U and 2U cable managers and recovering rack space which can now be used for active devices.

When you use An D Cable’s slim 4” Vertical Cable Managers, (VCM), you can save even more space allowing you to gain floor space and move racks closer together.

This alone can result in a cost savings of between $4,000 and $9,000 per 4 system installations.

But that’s just the start of how you’ll save money. When you use AnD Cable Products’ slim 4” Vertical Cable Managers (VCM), you can save even more space, as they enable you to gain floor space by moving the racks closer together.

Below is a Whitepaper we’ve written that will take you through this step-by-step.

WHITEPAPER – Optimizing Server Cabinet Rack Space to Maximize Efficiency and Reduce Costs

Optimizing Server Cabinet Rack Space to Maximize Efficiency and Reduce Costs FREE Guide - AnD Cable Products

Smart optimization can help you increase rack space and realize significant equipment cost savings. Read our step-by-step guide that shows you how – and how much you could save.

  • How Much Rack Space You Could Save
  • How to Optimize for Maximum Efficiency
  • Savings for New and Retrofit Installations
  • Overall Cost and Space Savings Post-Optimization

Improve Airflow for Greater HVAC Efficiency

Not only do Zero U Cable Management Racks save space, but they can also help you improve server airflow no matter what your HVAC configuration. Not only are “spaghetti mess” wires ugly and potentially damaging, but they also impede airflow. This results in higher operating temperatures and reduced efficiency along with the potential damage to equipment. 

But also as rack density increases, so do challenges to HVAC systems. This is why hot and cold aisle containment, assisted by the right rack systems and better cabling solutions is essential. This is true for both hyperscale data centers and edge data centers. Whether hot or cold aisle containment is right for you will depend on your situation. 

But either way, optimizing your rack space is just the first step. Adding the right containment plan and HVAC solution can also save you a lot of money in the long run. 

Use Remote Monitoring

With modern technology, it is easy to monitor data centers remotely. This is through physical layer network security, monitoring, and control systems. Through this solution, you can not only monitor your systems, but often make control changes as well.

This eliminates temperature changes from workers entering and exiting the data center floor, saves time and money spent on on-site personnel, and can facilitate repairs by pinpointing problems and taking the guesswork out of repairs. 

A cloud server means monitoring can happen anywhere, managers and technicians can receive real time alerts, and solutions can be immediately deployed. It’s one of the best ways to do more with less. 

Go Green When Possible

Finally, there are infinite ways to go green with your data center. Not only are renewable energy sources available, but there are many ways to conserve energy. Many are listed above, like server optimization, hot and cold aisle containment, and remote monitoring. But there are also countless examples of how Amazon, Facebook, and other tech giants are “greening” their data centers

With the greater demands of AI, remote work, and increased internet speeds and 5G demands, these steps are more important than ever. Green initiatives are vital to energy and cost savings over time. 

A global recession still looms, and while it may be short lived, there are always ups and downs in any industry. Preparing for the next downturn is not just taking advantage of savings now, but it a viable way to plan for a better, more sustainable future. That sustainability impacts not only your business, but the companies you serve and the planet we all live on. 

Doing more with less isn’t just a short term solution. It’s a better way of doing business. Make a start by Contacting Us to discuss your needs.

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/

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Choosing the Right Power Cord – Rack Optimization Tips

Choosing the Right Power Cord - Rack Optimization Tips - AnD Cable Management Blog

There are several aspects of optimizing data centers, from making the best use of space, time, power, and personnel. But there are some surprisingly simple solutions that are often overlooked with power cords, especially when it comes to rack optimization. Here are just a few of them.

Choosing the Right Power Cord - Rack Optimization Tips - AnD Cable Management Blog

SVT vs. SJT Power Cords

One of the first needs of a data center is power, and while there are debates about DC powering data centers, for the most part, AC power is the answer, and that means that a part of rack optimization includes the routing of power cords

Related to that is the durability of these cords, their flexibility, and to an extent their cost. However, there is a certain resistance to making the switch from more common SJT cords to their younger, smaller brother, SVT power cords. 

The issue is primarily perception. SJT power cords are thicker, so they must be better, right? The answer is more complex than that. To understand, we need to look briefly at what these cords actually do:

  • Deliver power safely to components in the rack system
  • Have the flexibility to be routed through racks and between delicate components
  • Must be color coded to assist with organization and prevent mistakes during moves and changes

That sounds pretty basic, right? Power cables, and many other cables used in data centers essentially are. So why choose one over the other?

SVT Power Cord Advantages

The primary difference between SVT and SJT cords is thickness, which plays a significant role. Both are portable, can be color coded, easily withstand the heat of the data center environment, and are capable of carrying the exact same loads. 

SJT cords have been standard for a long time, and their thickness may make them seem “tougher”. But thinner SVT cords are capable of more bend angles, take up less room (facilitating airflow), and are lighter. These aid rack optimization and organization.

But of course, SVT cords also cost less per unit. Over large moves and changes or even when designing a new data center, this can make a huge difference. 

In this case, thinner (and cheaper) is better. 

Power Cords are Only Part of the Picture

Of course, when we start talking about power cords, it is important to go back to some of the basics of rack optimization. 

  • First, use 28 AWG “skinny” patch cords. They are 36% thinner than other cables, which allows you to use high-density patch panels. This simple change in cords saves you a lot of rack space, and cuts the RU needed for patch panels in half. Skinnier patch cords also allow for more airflow as well
  • Second, replace 1RU and 2RU horizontal cable managers with AnD Cable Products Zero U Cable Management Racks. They’ve been designed to not take up the valuable vertical space typical cable managers do, but instead install in the same U as the device, saving significant rack space

Once you have done these two things, you’ll often more than double the ports you can fit in a single rack. Not only will you save space and money, and prevent the spaghetti mess of wiring often found in server racks after moves and changes, but you will save additional rack footprints, allowing you to increase density without losing computing power or memory. 

WHITEPAPER – Optimizing Server Cabinet Rack Space to Maximize Efficiency and Reduce Costs

Optimizing Server Cabinet Rack Space to Maximize Efficiency and Reduce Costs FREE Guide - AnD Cable Products

Smart optimization can help you increase rack space and realize significant equipment cost savings. Read our step-by-step guide that shows you how – and how much you could save.

  • How Much Rack Space You Could Save
  • How to Optimize for Maximum Efficiency
  • Savings for New and Retrofit Installations
  • Overall Cost and Space Savings Post-Optimization

Optimizing Other Cables

There are other steps you can take as well. Optimizing your Ethernet cables (while taking into account power, latency, and reach), looking at Direct Attach Copper (DACs) cables, Active Optical Cables (AOCs), and fiber optic cable assemblies for optimization opportunities, and keeping up with innovations like plastic polymer cables can also set you up for the most optimal use of cables and cords in your data center.

The last item highlights perhaps the most important thing you can do to optimize your data center: keeping up with evolving technology. There are always new developments, faster and lighter cords, better power solutions, and more. Consider what you can do each time to make moves or changes to increase the efficiency of your data center no matter what size it is.

The good news is, you don’t have to do this alone. At AnD Cable, we keep up with the newest and best solutions for everything you need for your data center, from racks to cable management to cords and cables. We offer remote monitoring solutions and more. 

Have questions about data center solutions? Do you want to talk about optimizing your  rack usage and cable management? Get in touch today! We can’t wait to start a conversation about how we can help you. And if you’re ready to get started, request a quote. We’ll be with you every step of the way. 

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/

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Hot and Cold Aisle Containment in Data Centers

Feature Hot and Cold Aisle Containment in Data Centers - AnD Cable Management Blog

Data centers are often made up of hot and cold aisles, and the design of the hot / cold aisle data center is far from new. However, the traditional setup causes warm air exhaust from one aisle to flow into the air intake of the next, meaning that the overall efficiency of the data center is impacted. And really, that’s what hot and cool aisle containment is all about.

Hot and Cold Aisle Containment in Data Centers - AnD Cable Management Blog
Balancing hot and cold aisles is more important than ever to running an efficient data center

As rack density increases, especially in edge data centers and hyperscale data centers, the need for efficiency increases. This is also impacted by the fact that there are more green data centers, who may be generating their own energy using solar or other renewable resources. 

How does containment work and how does it impact your data center?

Remote Monitoring and Temperature Control

Of course, before we get to containment itself, it’s a good reminder to revisit physical layer monitoring. To know how effective any containment effort is, it’s necessary to monitor temperatures. This is most often done with temperature indicating panels, three per rack at the top, middle, and bottom, so that intake temperatures can be monitored regularly.

Of course, someone entering the area to manually check temperatures is yet another disruption to airflow, so remote monitoring as a part of physical network security is essential. This allows managers not only to monitor these temperatures, but receive alerts and take action if something goes wrong. 

A150 Remote Physical Layer Network Security Monitoring Elements
The A150 Remote Physical Layer Remote Monitoring system tracks temperature among many other elements that reduce risk and increase efficiency in data centers

But the most important fact for this discussion is to know what temperatures are so that efficiency and the effectiveness of containment can be monitored.

What is Aisle Containment?

Aisle containment is essentially isolating aisles by relative temperature. Essentially it means placing doors at the end of each aisle, and then adding panels, or barriers, from the top of the cabinet upwards. 

The more airtight this containment is, the more efficient cooling can be, and the easier it is to manage airflow. It’s pretty simple, but there are a couple of different approaches, each with its own pros and cons.

Hot vs. Cold Aisle Containment

There are two ways to manage aisle containment: hot and cold aisle containment. And they work exactly the way they sound.

  • Hot Aisle Containment: Hot aisles are contained, leaving the rest of the room at a more comfortable cool aisle temperature. It’s also easier to manage in many cases.
  • Cold Aisle Containment: Cold aisles are isolated or contained, which means the rest of the room stays at the warmer hot aisle temperature. This can also make getting the right amount of airflow tricky due to pressure changes, but managed properly it can deliver the most uniform temperature air to servers.. 

Choosing the right type of aisle containment for your data center depends on your situation, but there are some differences between new data center construction and retrofitting an existing data center.

Retrofitting vs. New Data Center Construction

In the case of a new data center, most of the time hot aisle containment is the method of choice. This is easier to set up in a new data center, as that allows you to start with the type of containment you need, and to set up HVAC systems and sensors to accommodate that. 

This creates an easier environment for technicians to work in when necessary, and is overall a more efficient choice. However, things are different when it comes to existing data centers

Existing data centers are easier to retrofit with cool aisle containment. While there is some additional monitoring, the way cooling systems work simply means this process is simpler in a currently operating system without creating expensive downtime for making moves and changes and installing containment. 

That doesn’t mean that no new data center will be built with cool aisle containment. It simply means that hot aisle containment is a more frequent choice. 

Partial Containment Solutions

When it comes to retrofitting, sometimes full aisle containment in either format is not possible. In those cases, partial containment is a solution. How is this achieved?

Often plastic strips can be used, similar to those you would go through walking into an industrial freezer or even certain restaurant kitchens. These can be hung at the end of aisles and from the tops of servers to the ceiling, just like other containment methods.

While not as effective, partial containment can be easy to retrofit and implement, and in some cases is about 75% as effective as full containment. For existing data centers looking for a quick and inexpensive efficiency solution, partial containment is a viable option. 

But containment is just a part of rack cooling solutions, and there are some new and exciting ones. 


WHITEPAPER – Optimizing Server Cabinet Rack Space to Maximize Efficiency and Reduce Costs

Optimizing Server Cabinet Rack Space to Maximize Efficiency and Reduce Costs FREE Guide - AnD Cable Products

Smart optimization can help you increase rack space and realize significant equipment cost savings. Read our step-by-step guide that shows you how – and how much you could save.

  • How Much Rack Space You Could Save
  • How to Optimize for Maximum Efficiency
  • Savings for New and Retrofit Installations
  • Overall Cost and Space Savings Post-Optimization

The Addition of Liquid Cooling

Data center cooling has evolved from older, inefficient systems to more contemporary ones in a relatively short period of time. However, one thing that has been around for a while but is experiencing a boom in denser, modern data centers is liquid cooling. 

Why? Well, in most cases liquid cooling is more efficient than air cooling in data centers, and when the two are used in conjunction, generally the best results can be achieved. The larger data centers get, the more power they consume, the greater the push towards a blended approach to cooling that not only saves power and is better for the environment, but prolongs the life of equipment and saves space as well. 

But even with the addition of liquid cooling, it’s all about efficient use of rack space and the airflow around them. 

It’s All About Airflow

No matter what kind of aisle containment is used, and no matter how efficient the cooling system, saving space, improving efficiency, and keeping things organized, maximizing rack space efficiency and airflow is vital.

That’s why data centers choose ZeroU racks and cable management systems. They not only help avoid the spaghetti mess and all the cable issues that can arise from it, but also help maximize airflow and save significant rack space in any system.

Whether you are retrofitting a data center or engaged in new construction, we have the rack system that’s right for you. 

Contact AnD Cable Products today for all of your cable, rack, and physical network security needs. We’d love to start a conversation about the right solution for you. 

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/

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Edge Data Centers – Space and the Final Frontier

Edge of space - Edge Data Centers - Space and the Final Frontier - Cable Management Blog

Computing on the edge: it seems that everyone is doing it, from big industry to manufacturers, from ISPs to Cloud Computing centers. When you can locate computing and analytics power closer to machines connected via the IoT and other data sources, the faster you can gather data, and the more data you can store and analyze in a timely manner. For some, edge data centers seem like the final frontier for data.

Feature Edge Data Centers - Space and the Final Frontier - Cable Management Blog

This has resulted in data centers that vary in size, from the size of a very large cabinet to those contained in the space of a small shipping container. But like any journey to the edge, there are challenges and risks. There are two primary ones we will address here:

  • Temperature – Because of the small spaces edge data centers often occupy, airflow and temperature control can be tricky.
  • Space – Smaller size also means that saving space is critical, and on the flip side, can also enable more airflow and indirect cooling in a confined area.

In this way, the two primary challenges are related, and often a solution that mitigates one will also help mitigate the other. Let’s take a quick look at each of these.

Controlling the Environment on the Edge

The temperatures that edge data centers operate at are critical. And there is a huge difference between the cooling we need for a building designed to keep people comfortable, and a building designed to serve machines. Think of it this way: if someone opens the door to your office, you may feel a blast of warm or cold air, depending on the time of year. Your discomfort disappears quickly when the door closes, as the HVAC system takes over, and brings air back into the broad temperature tolerances humans can endure.

However, what happens when you go to an edge data center and open the door? The answer is, it depends on where it is. Large, brick and mortar data centers can be located in areas with minimal environmental challenges and low risk of natural disasters. But edge data centers must be located, well, where they are needed. That means in dusty and dirty environments, areas with extreme temperature fluctuations, and more.

There are really only two choices:

  • Develop and deploy equipment designed to withstand extremes, at a higher price point. A good example is cellular equipment like that developed by AT&T. However, the cost of this equipment is too high for standard edge data center deployment at scale.
  • Work with existing, readily available equipment and use unique strategies to combat environmental changes at a small scale, including using tents or shrouds for entry and exit, using handheld temperature and humidity monitors to evaluate current conditions, and developing strategic plans for unexpected events.

Another part of the solution is to use remote monitoring, AI and the IoT in edge data centers to mitigate the need for human intervention. Monitoring the health of equipment and preventing disaster in the first place is one of the keys to efficient management of edge data centers.

This is but one of the challenges data center managers face. The second is the efficient use of available space.

Saving Space

While cooling and environmental control are critical, so is the efficient use of space. This can result in increased airflow and easier HVAC solutions while also enabling more servers to be installed in the same amount of space.

This involves a few key steps:

  • Rack Selection – Whether a data center uses 23” or 19” racks, there are rack solutions that take up less space, and are also able to use better rack management options.
  • Cable ManagementZeroU horizontal cable managers makes more room for servers in a single rack, and they prevent the “spaghetti mess” that can happen in server racks, and be especially problematic in edge data centers that are more compact.
  • Compact Vertical Cable Management11U cable managers also save space and keep cables organized and easy to access should moves, changes, or repairs be needed.

Anything that can be done to save space in an edge data center makes facing the other challenges related to environmental control easier, but it also has another impact: an economic one. The less space you need to get the computing power you need, the more compact your data center can be. Alternatively, this can give you space to scale as needed without creating yet another data center space.

At the edge, there are always challenges, but there are also solutions. From controlling the environment in and around the data center to using the space in the most efficient way possible, with the right equipment, these obstacles can be transformed into opportunities to change not only how much data is collected and how quickly it can be acted upon, but where it happens as well.

Do you have questions about saving space in your edge data center? Are you looking for remote monitoring solutions? Then contact us here at AnD Cable. We’d love to start a conversation about how we can help you.

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/

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How to Design an Effective Data Center Cable Labeling System

How to Design an Effective Data Center Cable Labeling System - AnD Cable Management Blog

One of the things we talk about often in cable management besides having the right cable management and rack management systems that make your data center the most efficient, is using an effective cable labeling system.

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A cable labeling system makes effective cable management MUCH easier!
A cable labeling system makes effective cable management MUCH easier!

The reason is simple. Nearly every technician has said, at one point or another, “I wish I had labeled that.” So whether you are just getting started with labels or you are labeling existing systems, the question is the same. How do you design an effective cable labeling system? Here are some things to consider.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

First, use a reusable label system. Not only is this better for the environment, it is better for your system as well. For example, if you use UniTag reusable cable labels, they snap on (and off) so you can mark and identify cables quickly.

UniTag Cable Labels -  reusable cable labels allow you to mark and identify virtually any size cable or group of network cables and reduce your cable label costs
UniTag Cable Labels – reusable cable labels allow you to mark and identify virtually any size cable or group of network cables and reduce your cable label costs

But more importantly, if you change something or replace a cable, you simply remove the cable label and put it back on the new cable or in the new location. Easy, and with no waste. It saves time, too. There’s no need to reprint a label or find a different connector. 

Use the Right Cable Label Printer

This might seem like a no-brainer but starting with the right equipment when you’re developing an effective cable labeling system is just as important as when you are planning the layout or rearranging your data center. Ideally a label printer should be portable, have a large memory to load a variety of label styles, and should also be efficient.

Efficiency means long battery life, but also the efficient use of label cartridges. How often have you trimmed a label before applying it? Wouldn’t it be better of the label was the right size in the first place?

Epson LW-PX Printers are the most efficient on the market, working to continually save you money
Epson LW-PX Printers are the most efficient on the market, working to continually save you money

Epson LW-PX printers have innovative technology that reduces lead margins and will “rollback” before printing to prevent that waste. They also have auto full and half cut features that allow you to print a variety of labels in the field, and the large storage capacity means you’ll always have the labels you need at your disposal, from custom created ones to dozens of industry standard symbols.

The other important feature is toughness. Everyone has that employee who frequently has a case of the “dropsies.” But accidents happen to everyone, and printers get dropped, fall off of racks, or suffer even worse treatment. The Epson printer body meets MilSpec drop tests, and has a built in handle that makes it easier to carry (and less likely to be dropped).

Starting with the right printer and the right reusable label tags is the foundation for your cable labeling strategy.

Color Coded Cable Labels

One of the downfalls of a labeling strategy can be too many labels of the same color, and several flag ties that make it challenging to see what is going on. Using a variety of colors in a color coded cable run helps you identify cables at a glance, and can help you follow cables more easily.

Because you can use the Epson labels on any size of cable or group of cables, you ‘ll reduce label clutter, which comes with a whole host of advantages.

Label Size and Information Matters

Sometimes you need more detail than you can put in one line of type. Use labels that are large enough to include multiple lines of type, so your labels make sense to everyone in the data center. Remember, you might not be the one coming back to work on that particular server, so the more detail you include in your labels, the better.

This also impacts readability. A color can tell the technician what type of cable they are dealing with. The label itself tells them the greater detail they need to know to follow the cable and troubleshoot quickly. The reason for labels is that moment later on when a technician is troubleshooting.

Consider the question, “What would another technician need to know about this cable to work efficiently?” That’s the information that should be included in your label.

Best practice guide to a three line cable label:

  1. Near end termination – Port number on patch panel or hub or wall outlet number or physical location
  2. Far end termination – Patch panel location or hub/switch location and port number
  3. Cable purpose – circuit ID or functional description of a cable or patch cord
Three lines of text on the cable label tape and plastic cable label provides lots of space to record vital information
Three lines of text on the cable label tape and plastic cable label provides lots of space to record vital information

Label Wherever You Can

For label tags, removable adhesive label tape may be the best choice, but there are other applications your printer and your labels need to serve. You may need to label a heat shrink tube, or you may want a fluorescent label for some applications.

Epson Labelworks PX printers offer different kinds of label cartridges to meet different needs. You should encourage technicians, and remember yourself, those moments when you wish you had labeled something, even if it isn’t a cable. Instead of thinking, “I wish I had labeled that,” you can say, “I’m glad I labeled that.”

Have a Standard Cable Labeling Nomenclature

No matter what cable labeling system you have and what printer you use to implement it, it will all be for nothing unless everyone is on the same page. Think of it: one technician might call a group of cables one thing, and another tech might label it differently, or not understand the label on the cable.

Not only is it important to label, but part of your labeling system should include a “key” of terms, abbreviations, and names. Everyone should use the same “key” or system. That way, there is no misunderstanding about what a cable run is, or what that abbreviation really stands for.

Final Thoughts

Are there any secrets to an effective cable labeling system? Not really. It’s pretty simple:

  • Use the right tags and equipment
  • Use color coding where appropriate
  • Be consistent with terms and labels
  • Label everything that you might wish later was labeled
  • Include all relevant details on your labels

With the right cable labeling system, you’ll save time, money, and energy. Your installers and technicians will be more efficient, and overall your data center will be more profitable.

Need help with your cable labeling system? Contact AnD Cable Products today. We’ll help you find the right solution to meet your needs.

Introducing the Ultimate Data Center Cable Labeling System

Cable Management Just Got More Economical, Efficient and Robust

AnD Cable Products and Epson Labelworks have teamed up to develop the Ultimate Data Center Cable Labeling System with a selection of bundled cable labeling products that, when used together will revolutionize your cable mangaement, efficiency and costs.

UniTag® Reusable Cable Labels – A plastic snap-on cable labeling system that provides a quick and easy way to mark and identify cables

Epson Labelworks PX Printers – A portable label and wire marker solution with exclusive time and costsaving features for creating custom labels

Epson’s PX Label Tapes Fit Onto AnD Cable’s UniTag® Cable Labels PERFECTLY!


About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

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Server Rack Configuration and Cable Management Best Practices

Feature - Server Rack Configuration and Cable Management Best Practices - AnD Cable Management Blog

There are only three types of currency in the world: time, money, and expertise – and we can’t afford to waste any of them. You have the expertise needed to run a data center and you hire others with the same expertise. But there are two things you can always save in your data center: time and money.

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Data center server rack configuration with proper cable management using best practices

It seems like we never have enough of either one, and time and money are often directly tied together. So how do you make the most of both every single day?

Perhaps the most important thing is to optimize wherever possible. Here are some ideas for you, things that will save you both time and money in your data center.

Use Your Rack Space Wisely

The more efficiently you use your rack space, the more you can fit in your data center. In a time when many data centers are experiencing a need for rapid growth, the ideal use of space is key. So what can you do?

  • Use the right sized racks for your equipment – Many components are moving to 23” cable management racks rather than 19” ones. Be sure you have the right server rack, so you are not wasting space and risking equipment damage.
  • Use smaller gauge cables where possible – This allows for more airflow and improved equipment efficiency while also taking up less valuable space.
  • Use Zero U cable rack organizers – These will not only save you useful shelf space, but they are also easier to install, and can make repairs and changes faster too by giving technicians and installers more space to work on.

All of these things will make sure you are using your rack space in the very best way.

Avoid a Disorganized Server Rack

While racks rarely start out that way, additions, changes, and moves can result in a real mess at the rear of your server rack. Every technician has seen this from time to time, and it is not only a waste of time to sort through, but it can cost a data center in many ways.

Cables that are hanging unsupported like a curtain and not routed properly will often break at critical points, losing continuity. Connectors also suffer more wear and tear, and airflow is adversely affected, which is harder on equipment.

If you have a disorganized server rack get it cleaned up and optimize that rack as soon as you can. Use Velcro cable wraps and ties to bundle cables, and take the next time saving step, which involves labeling and organization.

Develop a Label Protocol and Label Everything

The ANSI TIA 606-B is a voluntary cable labelling standard, but one that helps data centers be as organized as possible. It involves setting up a consistent and standardized system for labelling cables and equipment. It involves using:

  • Permanent labels
  • Labels at both ends of the cables
  • Legible labels
  • Good record keeping of labeling protocols and physical locations
  • Color coding
  • A common nomenclature everyone understands

Once you have established a labeling protocol, ensure that everything is labeled. You never want to have to say, or hear someone on your team say, “I wish I had labeled that” again. Make labeling a standard procedure.

At AnD Cable Products, we offer everything from reusable cable labels to a variety of different sized Velcro cable wraps and zip ties for your cable management needs. Need something you don’t see on our website? Feel free to reach out and Request a Quote.

Optimize Your Data Center for Airflow

Whether you run cables under the floor or overhead, you need to have a plan to maximize airflow in your data center. This is easier on your HVAC system and better for your equipment overall. Any large variations in air temperature, pressure, or humidity will all impact your data center in one way or another.

This means using the right size and length cables, rack cable management in the room, and having an overall airflow plan in place. This includes all of the steps above, but adding the extra layer of understanding how each action you take will affect airflow.

Remote Monitoring and Automation

Finally, remote monitoring and automation mean fewer technicians in and out of the facility, which is easier on the HVAC systems and airflow efficiency, reducing costs. It also means you can spot problems before they start. You’ll know what is going on with cables before damage is visible to the human eye.

Not only will there be warnings and alarms related to problems, a remote monitoring system can reduce energy usage in your data center as well. This physical layer network security is often overlooked and not given the attention it should, but the right solution can save you both time and money.

There are only three kinds of currency. Time, money, and expertise. If you are going to use all of them to the best of your ability, you’ll need to save time and money in your data center. Need help or have questions about how to optimize your data center? We have answers and everything you need to get started today.


Optimizing Server Cabinet Rack Space to Maximize Efficiency and Reduce Costs

Optimizing Rack Space and Air Flow in Server Racks and Cabinets

Smart optimization can help you increase rack space and realize significant equipment cost savings. Read our step-by-step guide that shows you how – and how much you could save.

  • How Much Rack Space You Could Save
  • How to Optimize for Maximum Efficiency
  • Savings for New and Retrofit Installations
  • Overall Cost and Space Savings Post-Optimization

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

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Rapid Data Center Growth: Keys to Rack Management Success

Rapid Data Center Growth: Keys to Rack Management Success - AnD Cable Management Blog

The COVID pandemic hit, and workers headed home for good, but not just to binge old episodes of Fringe and eat ice cream on the sofa. They headed there to work, which meant that suddenly data centers were overloaded. Operating at near maximum capacity, HVAC systems strained to keep up, and data center managers lost fistfuls of hair seeking solutions to keeping up with the exponential pace of data center growth.

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Rapid Data Center Growth: Keys to Rack Management Success - AnD Cable Management Blog
Data center growth has been rapid in response to COVID-19, with remote workers needing to be online, all the time

But they recovered rapidly, developing plans for expansion and revamping of their current space, and socially distanced technicians went to work on keeping up with growth as best they could.

Now, even as recovery looms, many companies have discovered the huge advantage of remote work, and more workers will be staying in their home offices wearing athletic-leisure wear (at least from the waist down) than at any time in history.

That means the boom of data center growth is not yet over. So what are the keys to rack management success and making the most of your data center space? Here are some thoughts for you.

Assess Your Rack Management

The first step is to look at your current space. Do you have a spaghetti mess of wiring at the rear of each rack, and is your hardware suffering from previous rushed expansion and repair attempts? There is hope.

There is a very common two rack configuration in data centers. The first rack is a network rack and the second is used for horizontal cross connects. There is nothing wrong with this staple setup except that with some small and rapid changes, you can free up a great deal of space in each rack. Here’s how. 

Change Your Cable Managers

First, the cross connect rack on average contains 10 2RU cable managers managing the cables from 9 2RU patch panels with 48 ports each. A simple way to free up 20 RU of space is to replace the 2RU cable managers with Zero U Cable Management Racks.

It’s actually a simple change, and you have literally transformed your cabinet space in a matter of moments. But that isn’t all. In your two cabinet system, you typically have two 2RU cable managers, which if replaced using the above mentioned ZeroU Cable Management Racks frees up an additional 4RU of space.

Zero U Horizontal Cable Management Rack - AnD Cable Products
Our Zero U Cable Management Rack helps you keep track of your cables and manage troubleshooting – while saving you heaps of rack space

Between the two cabinets you have now freed up 24 RU of rack space. Is your configuration different? Simply think of it this way – every 2 RU cable manager you replace with a ZeroU unit frees up 2 RU of space.

For every 1 RU cable manager you replace, you gain 1 RU of space. Check out some of our best sellers below:

What else can you do to improve the utilization of your racks?

Use the Right Cables

We mentioned that 2 RU patch panels are common in the cross connect rack. In fact, there are nine of them in our example. But there is a simple change you can make to reduce the rack space you use.

Switch to 28 AWG patch cables. Because they are 36% skinnier than their counterparts, you can have the same 48 port patch panel, but substitute a compact 1RU unit instead. That cuts the amount of space you are using in half. This means your two rack system can now hold twice as many ports in the same space. Select your prefered option below – and don’t forget some cable labels for easy identification and to make troubleshooting easier:

Show me the Money

So what will this cost you? Let’s look really quickly at a breakdown if you are retrofitting your existing racks:

  • 10 ZeroU Cable Management Racks will cost you $211.00.
  • However, since you are going to free up enough room to add another 10 to the same rack, your cost will be $422.00.
  • You’ve eliminated the need for another rack, saving you $1,600.00 – $3,000.00 – or you’ve freed up space in that rack for another system.

Repeating the process of course saves you money quickly. You can also replace bulky vertical cable managers with smaller 4” units at the same time, saving yourself even more space and money.

This works the same way with new installations, reducing the space you use initially. Now you are using five cabinets rather than eight for four systems with the same number of ports.

The Cable Management Difference

One of the largest issues in rapid data center growth is floor space, airflow management, and HVAC requirements. The key to getting ahead of all of those things is the right cable management plan and efficient rack management.

Starting with ZeroU Cable Managers and the right patch cables can get your data center off on the right foot.

The Right Partnership

There are a lot of companies who sell racks, cables, and cable management equipment, but you need more than just a salesman. You need someone who understands data centers, can respond to your individual needs, and can create and ship you what you need in a timely manner.

Personal service makes all the difference. AnD Cable Products offers unique products and customized solutions should you need them. You’ll talk to a real person with real-world knowledge and experience.

Is your data center growing? Contact us today. We’re here to help you grow efficiently and manage the space you already have. We can’t wait to talk with you.


Optimizing Server Cabinet Rack Space to Maximize Efficiency and Reduce Costs

Optimizing Rack Space and Air Flow in Server Racks and Cabinets

Smart optimization can help you increase rack space and realize significant equipment cost savings. Read our step-by-step guide that shows you how – and how much you could save.

  • How Much Rack Space You Could Save
  • How to Optimize for Maximum Efficiency
  • Savings for New and Retrofit Installations
  • Overall Cost and Space Savings Post-Optimization

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

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The Spaghetti Mess – Rack Cable Management Essentials

The Spaghetti Mess – Rack Cable Management Essentials - AnD Cable Management Blog

We often talk about the importance of network cable management in data centers, and how important it is to efficiency, airflow, equipment longevity, and more. But what about on managing cables on the rack itself? 

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Do your racks have a ‘Spaghetti Mess’ of cables?

In fact, we know (because you’ve told us) that nearly everyone has encountered the “spaghetti mess” at some point or another. This is a bad thing, not just because of how it looks, but because of the possible damage, lack of efficiency, and even increased maintenance costs.

But there are solutions, and if you understand the essentials of rack cable management, things can be pretty simple for you. You don’t ever have to look at the “spaghetti mess” in your data center again. 

Let’s start at the beginning: 

The Server Rack Itself

First of all, we all know there are different kinds of racks and different sizes. While improving technology means some things are getting smaller, server components are actually getting larger. That means that wider racks, on the order of 23” cable racks or wider are more common. You can’t use a 19” cable rack for a 23” component. The end result will not only be ugly but could be disastrous.

In addition, racks, specifically in California but in other locations as well, must be built to withstand earthquakes and other natural disasters. It’s a pretty major requirement, and even if you aren’t in California, there may be state or local ordinances that cover the kind of racks you can use in your data center. The rack is the foundation for a good rack cable management system.

Racks also come in different levels of quality. Always remember that cheap is probably cheap for a reason. You want racks to not only be the right size, but to be sturdy and reliable. Cheap racks that bend, fit together poorly, and that don’t work well with standard adapters and rack cable managers will end up costing you more in the long run. Make sure you have the right rack for the right job. 

Rack Cable Managers

Rack cable managers, sometimes called horizontal lacing bars, are a critical part of cable management. There are a number of varieties, both horizontal and vertical. They are often classified by the amount of space they take up on the rack. 

Horizontal Zero U Cable Management Server Rack – 23″

For example, our ZeroU rack cable management systems doesn’t take up any rack space, allowing you to be more efficient with the use of your space, reducing the overall footprint of your servers. This means using fewer racks and leaving more space for airflow. 

A good rack cable management system also gives installers and maintenance personnel space to work. They have room to get tools and their hands in where needed, meaning they can work faster and more efficiently. 

Bundling and Labeling

Bundling like cables together keeps your racks looking neat, avoiding the spaghetti mess look. But it does more than that. Running like cables together reduces electromagnetic interference, makes finding what you are looking for easier, and again reduces maintenance time. 

Bundling can be done with zip ties, and while sometimes that is appropriate, most often Velcro is a better solution. It’s reusable, can be loosened or tightened as needed when doing adds, moves, and changes. 

The other important essential? Labeling. When was the last time you thought, “I wish I (or someone else) had labeled that?” When troubleshooting and executing repairs, a simple label can reduce the time needed to sort through cables exponentially. Also, if you properly and accurately label cables, you are less likely to forget where they should be terminated. They are less likely to get tangled as you install them, allowing you to avoid the spaghetti mess.

Cable Length and Rack Cable Management

Another simple way to avoid the Spaghetti mess? Be sure your cables are cut to the right length and terminate them appropriately. Network cables that are too long are much more likely to tangle or get wrapped around one another. 

The key is simply following the old carpenter’s rule: measure twice, cut once. You don’t want cables to be too short either. This can result in sharp bends and even breakage, and those things can result in data slowdowns or worse, failures. 

Have a Rack Cable Management Plan

What is the most important element of efficient rack cable management and avoiding the spaghetti mess? Having a plan and having everything on hand that you need. Whether you are renovating and updating your data center, building a new one, or replacing old components, develop a plan.

  • How Many? – Determine the size and number of racks you will need and order them ahead of time. 
  • Plan Ahead – Develop a plan to manage cables and order the horizontal rack organizers you will need – and vertical racks!
  • Network Cable Requirements – Determine the amount of cable and the type you will need. Order them ahead of time, but also make sure you have the terminals you will need on hand. 
  • Velcro! Need we say it again? – Make sure you have more than enough Velcro cable ties on hand to bundle cables as needed. 
  • Colored Zip Ties – While not always the best solution (see Velcro) overall, zip ties still have their place in rack cable management. Have plenty on hand to aid with cable routing. 
  • Cable Labels – have plenty of custom labels on hand and use them. Make sure every installer is on the same page as far as the way things will be labelled. 

A plan will keep the spaghetti mess from developing in the first place, saving you hours later on. 

Find a Dependable Partner

Not to brag, but AnD Cable is one of the most dependable in the industry. You want a partner with unparalleled customer service who responds quickly to your needs and can even offer custom solutions when needed. 

We’ve been working with data centers for years, and we’d be happy to be your partner whether you are updating your data center, building a new one, or simply need a long term supplier for whatever the future holds.

Get in touch and let us know how we can help you. We’re here to answer your questions. Avoid the spaghetti mess, but if you have one already, let us help you get things cleaned up. 

WHITEPAPER – Understanding Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring in Modern Networks

Understanding Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring in Modern Networks - AnD Cable Products Whitepaper

An overview of the differences between stranded and solid conductor wiring, the properties of each and the best cable type to use in a variety of typical settings.

  • Types of Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring
  • Comparison of Electrical Properties
  • Factors Impacting Attenuation / Insertion Loss
  • Choosing the Right Cable


About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

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How Cable Management and Airflow Management Impact Each Other in Data Centers

How Cable Management and Airflow Management Impact Each Other - Cable Management Blog

Here’s the simple truth of the matter. Cable management can impact airflow management , and airflow should definitely inform the method, type, and execution of cable management. To understand how the two impact each other and what the best overall solution will be for your data center, it is important for use to take a look at cable management and airflow from a high level perspective.

Jump to Section:

How Cable Management and Airflow Management Impact Each Other
Airflow is an Important Factor in Data Centers

The Goal of Airflow Management

So what is the goal of airflow management? The goals are twofold: preventing large variations in air temperature and air pressure. This means separating supply air mass and return air mass through design.

Just grouping cables together with a zip tie does nothing to facilitate this and can actually result in a serious disruption of airflow. What happens as a result? Lower fan efficiency, higher HVAC costs, potential changes in pressure, and even equipment damage or failure.

The current problem? Because more people are working from home or adopting the work from anywhere culture as a result of COVID, data centers are having to increase capacity, and they may not have additional floorspace to accommodate more server racks. Since conventional cable management can use up as much as 25% of rack space, this means that intelligently designed rack cable management is more important than ever.

Because of this it is important that cable management and airflow be looked at as an entire package. There are two areas of cable management in a data center: cable management in the room itself, essentially the cables that run between server racks, and rack cable management.

Cable Management in the Room

Of course, we must manage the cables that run between server racks, and they have to go somewhere. There are essentially two approaches, and both can create unique issues. They are running cables under the floor or running cables overhead.

Perhaps the most common is underfloor cabling where the underfloor space is also used for cool air transport. This is usually a very efficient method for separating supply and return air masses. However. When you put more holes in the floor, say to accommodate more server racks, the risk of “bypass air” or mixing the two airflows increases.

Why not just go with overhead cable management then? In some cases, this works exceptionally well, although there are budget and logistical obstacles. The height of the cable pathway is also often an issue.

Think of it this way. If your data center uses the underfloor space for air system management and not cable management, overhead pathways are fine. If they are placed too high though, the warm return air underneath can actually get too turbulent, resulting in a mix of the supply and return air. This created a temperature bypass.

But this bypass also can increase variations in pressure throughout the data center, causing the fans and other mechanisms to work harder. It’s a delicate balance.

Rack Cable Management

There are a lot of best practices and industry standards for airflow and cable management between servers, but often rack cable management falls into the “out of sight, out of mind” category. That’s a mistake, as cable management at this critical point can have a huge impact on airflow management.

While this seems like it should be common sense, the practice of good rack cable management seems to be hit or miss. As early as 2002, research done by Paul Artman, David Moss and Greg Bennett (Dell PowerEdge 1650: Rack Impacts on Cooling of High Density Servers) showed that poorly bundled cables, overloading cables on a horizontal lacing bar (particularly 1U configurations) could result in as much as a nine degree increase in component temperature.

This is a good argument for ZeroU rack cable managers and other more advanced techniques. Also, more data centers are moving to 23” or larger racks as opposed to the standard 19” racks, because equipment manufacturers are constantly increasing the computing power per U space. As a result there are more cables per rack. As cable bundles get larger, they also need more space between them to increase airflow.

For some components that possess a single fan intake side and hot-switchable components on the other, there is really only one path for cables to go. Careful cable management means not only ensuring that the fan intake is not blocked, but that there is an airflow egress as well. Often specialized chimney cabinets that allow air to enter both the front and the rear of the cabinet can be used for these applications.

The Effect of Poor Cable Management

Poor cable management, whether cables between server racks or rack cable management, will negatively impact airflow management. More than just the increased costs associated with HVAC systems, poor airflow can also lead to premature equipment and cable failures, overheating, and even increased downtime.

5 Ways Effective Cable Management Benefits Your Data Center - Cable Management Blog
A ‘Spaghetti Mess’ of cables blocks network rack airflow very effectively!

Since uptime is the most important metric to most data centers, cable management solutions need to be an integral part of any planned data center and prioritized expansion.

Devising a Comprehensive Solution

What’s the solution? The best path is to be proactive rather than reactive. Plan airflow management and cable management together as part of an overall data center plan. Be sure you and your staff have the right tools and materials. This not only includes the right racks and rack cable management tools like ZeroU rack managers and chimney racks where needed, but things like Velcro, wire tags, and even colored zip ties to keep things organized.

If you do have to do a sudden expansion due to increases in demands, bring in the whole team and listen to everyone’s ideas. Use industry best practices where possible, but understand that creative solutions and innovation may be necessary in extraordinary times.

Do you have questions about effective rack cable management, or do you need tools and supplies to get started? Contact us here at AnD Cable. We have the materials you need and the know how to help you select the best product for your situation.

WHITEPAPER – Understanding Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring in Modern Networks

Understanding Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring in Modern Networks - AnD Cable Products Whitepaper

An overview of the differences between stranded and solid conductor wiring, the properties of each and the best cable type to use in a variety of typical settings.

  • Types of Stranded and Solid Conductor Wiring
  • Comparison of Electrical Properties
  • Factors Impacting Attenuation / Insertion Loss
  • Choosing the Right Cable


About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

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