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Optimizing Ethernet in Data Center Networks

Feature Ethernet Data Center Networks - AnD Cable Management Blog

Demand for faster data transfer, and more of it, has exploded exponentially over the last decade. Even before the pandemic, growth was already at exponential rates, but with the work from anywhere trend and more people gaming and streaming from home, demand rose even further. 

With it came an explosion in innovation, and a necessary one. Data Center Interconnects (DCI) Ethernet cable speeds increased from 100 Gb applications to 400 Gb and beyond. Server speeds have gone from 10 Gb to 25 Gb and beyond, with 100 Gb speeds on the horizon, and already in place in some data centers. 

The result is that data centers are now frequently operating like edge computing networks. Here is how it works. 

Ethernet Data Center Networks - AnD Cable Management Blog
Ethernet cable speeds have increased from 100 Gb applications to 400 Gb and beyond

Optimizing Ethernet in Data Centers

There are four factors in optimizing data center ethernet use: speed, power, reach, and latency. Speed is already being enhanced and optimized by the creation of better and more modern cable designs. But for the other areas, there is still work to be done. 

Power

When it comes to power, many data centers have gone green, with their own renewable energy sources. In most cases, they have access to all the power they need. The key is to use it in the most efficient way possible. With more power comes the issue of design, including hot and cold aisle design choices and more. 

Reach

Data center architecture must take a holistic approach, whether you are starting from scratch with a new data center or making moves and changes to update its current infrastructure. Everything from switches and routers to transceivers and overall physical design, reach must be weighed by efficiency vs. cost.

Latency

Finally, latency is related to the final user experience. When it comes to gaming or video conferencing, low latency is the expectation, while when conducting internet searches, it’s not as critical, but can still be an issue for users. As speed increases and fast becomes the norm, latency expectations change with it. 

These three areas are critical to how ethernet is used in data centers, but it is far from the only one. 

Definitive Guide to Understanding Ethernet Patch Cords in Modern Networks - AnD Cable Products Whitepaper
Ethernet cables differences, RJ45 Connectors and T586B vs T568A

Infrastructure Processing Units

How we manage this need for speed is changing on the hardware and software side of things as well. Infrastructure Processing Units (IPUs) run Software Defined Networking (SDN) programs away from the server core. This saves critical server bandwidth, but it comes with an additional load cost. 

As these advances develop, the demand for new and better ethernet cables arises. And as ethernet cables advance, IPUs hardware and software applications evolve as well. Both improve in sync with the other. It’s a developing relationship, but one data center manager’s must take advantage of. 

Edge Computing Centers 

One solution to speed is to move the data center closer to the end user. This has been a developing trend, but increasingly data centers are expanding to distributed models where the interconnections between resources drive both power and speed, creating a better overall experience for the end user, and reducing latency. 

This comes with challenges. As edge computing rapidly becomes the norm, that latency KPI gets lower and lower. Low latency is key, and specifically, DCI applications are critical to meeting new standards. Ethernet connections are a vital part of this change and growth.

The Need for Speed

What’s needed to make all of this work? The first is optical transceivers, which allow data centers to make reductions in the power they use, but enables them to increase bit rates at the same time. This allows for the increase of speed in the leaf-spine connections, a critical component in any data center, but especially those that are hyperscaling. 

This does not come without challenges, as not all ethernet cables are created equally, and interoperability can become an issue. 

To help with this, high-speed breakout cables are often used. These cables have one end that supports the aggregate rate and the other end is a series of disaggregated interfaces. With their speed comes performance challenges, especially over distances. However, there has been some rapid development in this area. 

The New Normal

As 400 Gb speeds become the norm and data centers are increasingly on the edge, there are many advantages. Distributed networks mean easier disaster recovery and backup planning and create the ability to use shared resources to meet shifting demands. 

However, this creates some challenges with testing and maintaining KPIs. Interoperability remains a key component of successful deployments. 

At AnD Cable Products, we understand these challenges. We offer everything your data center needs, from Zero U rack solutions to every type and style of cable you need. We can customize cables for your application, and offer a variety of other hardware solutions to meet your data center needs. When you are ready to upgrade your cables, make moves and changes, or even deploy a new data center or edge computing center, contact us. We’d love to be your partner in innovation

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff – Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cable labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and rack space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online at https://andcable.com/shop/

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How to Prevent Data Center Downtime

Data center downtime is no joke. It can literally make the difference between a data center surviving and failing. And a new study by the Ponemon Institute shows that modern data centers and data centers at the edge are more susceptible to downtime than ever before. This is because data centers are much more complex than they ever have been. Most core data centers suffer 2.4 facility shutdowns per year, and some of those last around 138 minutes – more than two hours! Edge computing data centers experience twice as many shutdowns, but that average half the duration of core data center outages.

In addition, it is helpful to remember that although total facility failures occur with the least frequency, individual server or rack failures can also be costly, especially in Edge data centers, where every piece of equipment has some critical function.

At the outset it is also important that we define core data centers and edge data centers. Edge data centers are usually about ⅓ the size of their counterparts, although the term edge does not refer to size. Edge refers more to the data center location, generally closer to where the data center is needed to increase speed and response times, and save bandwidth.

Jump to Section:

Data Center Downtime

Conflicting Priorities

Data center managers are faced with decisions about efficiency, the transition to Net Zero carbon emissions, and avoiding redundancies whenever possible, but this also can leave them susceptible to downtime events if a problem occurs. This is illustrated by the causes of downtime: UPS battery failures, human error, equipment failures, other UPS equipment failures, and cyberattacks.

Respondents to the survey revealed that over half (54%) are not using best-practices, and that risks of data center downtime are increased because of cost concerns.

The Cost of Downtime

While cost concerns often increase the risk of downtime, the actual cost of downtime can be much greater. According to a 2014 survey by Gartner, facility downtime cost an average of nearly $5,600 per minute, or between $140,000 to over half a million dollars per hour depending on the organization size. These costs continue to rise, with more recent statistics from the Ponemon Institute survey mentioned above calculating average costs at nearly $9,000 per minute.

It’s more than just the money costs though. The real cost comes in reputation and customer service. Data centers that suffer above average downtime are much more likely to go bankrupt. Uptime is perhaps more critical than it ever has been, and customers remember problems far more easily than they remember reliable service over time.

So what do we do to prevent data center downtime?

How to Prevent Data Center Downtime

There are solutions to downtime issues, and many are known to data center managers. However, they are easier said than done. Here are a few of them:

  • Adopt best-practices – The fact that most data centers know they are not following best-practices reveals they know what to do, they are just not doing it.
  • Invest in new equipment – Equipment failures come in outdated equipment not up to the current needs of the data center. Replacing it is one of the easiest ways to reduce or eliminate downtime.
  • Improve your training – Be sure that all employees, both existing and new, are aware of best practices and what you expect of them on the job. Make training comprehensive and focus on outcomes and skills that build long-term success.
  • Improve your documentation – Your data center plans, including power, cabling, cable management plans, and others should be thoroughly documented and available to employees. If not, in the words of Captain Picard, “Make it so.”
  • Don’t fight redundancy – Redundancy is a good thing for the most part. You certainly don’t want to overdo it, but you do need to have contingency plans and equipment in case downtime does happen.

Of course, these solutions are simplified, nor are they always possible for data center managers to achieve with the resources they have available.

There is Room for Improvement

The takeaway from this data is twofold. First, data center downtime at these rates are unacceptable for most organizations. The second is that there are solutions, and there is plenty of room for improvement. Among the solutions mentioned above, there are some critical elements.

  • Redundancy – This has been preached from the beginning for both core and edge data centers, yet half of data centers have issues in this area. As a result, there is a trend toward more redundant equipment, especially at the edge, as large and small operations seek to better manage data center downtime.
  • Remote monitoring systems and AI – The other advancement that seeks to solve the issue of human error and detect equipment issues before they become a problem is remote monitoring and AI. Machine learning can help data center managers fix issues before downtime occurs, and helps them respond faster when a problem does occur.

Simply adding these two things can take data centers a long way toward greater uptime and more reliable service. After all, this is the goal of both core and edge computing.

Whether you manage an existing data center or you are considering starting one from scratch, we here at AnD Cable Products are here for you. We can help you with everything from cable and rack management to labeling systems and remote monitoring. Have questions? Contact us today. We’d love to start a conversation about your specific needs.

Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control

A150 Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control System Brochure

Full visibility, network security and control of your physical layer environment. Monitor your entire hybrid cloud and IT infrastructure from a cloud-based, integrated dashboard:

  • Introducing the A150 System
  • A150 System Architecture – High-Level Overview
  • A150 System Features
  • System Controller Hardware and Specifications
  • Monitoring Controllers, Probes and Sensors

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

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Modular or Traditional Data Center Builds – Which is Better?

Modular or Traditional Data Center Build - Which is Better? Cable Management Blog

“The future of data centers is modular,” one popular website states. “The traditional data center is not dead,” says another. Who is right? What is the future of data centers? Is one better than the other, and if so, why?

Here are some pros and cons, and some potential answers data center managers might want to consider. 

Jump to Section:

Modular and Traditional Data Center

Modular vs. Traditional Data Center PUE

One of the first things we talk about with modular or traditional data centers is PUE, or Power Usage Efficiency. Most of the time, modular data centers have a lower PUE. However, there is a cost associated with that number.

Traditional data center builds often have a higher PUE initially because there is space for expansion and adding additional equipment. This can sometimes come with higher HVAC and other costs until the data center is at capacity and running at maximum efficiency. We’ll talk about that factor more in a moment. 

For modular data centers, because they are constructed with tight specifications and already at an efficient capacity per module, the PUE is lower from the start. All components are easily matched, and compact spaces are easier to control when it comes to cooling, humidity, and other factors.

What is the downside? When a brick and mortar data center is up and running at capacity and the design has been well executed, PUE levels can be similar, and it can be much simpler to make moves and changes without additional modules and construction. 

Security

As with PUE, there are two sides to this coin. The modular data center can be easier to secure, as they are more compact and self-contained. When installed behind a secure barrier with video and other surveillance measures, the physical security of a modular data center can be assured.

The flip side? Modular data centers may evolve and require additions over time, meaning the physical space will also have to be modified. Proper planning can mitigate this issue, but a traditional data center build can be easier to manage from this perspective, with security built into the construction itself, along with remote monitoring and other security features that must be handled differently with modular data centers. 

The argument over which is better can go either way, but the permanence of a traditional data center build often wins out when it comes to security discussions.

Modular vs. Traditional Real Estate

When locating a data center, we have talked about things like accessibility to a green power grid, the ability to construct your own green energy backups, and more. Real Estate that satisfies all of those requirements can be hard to find, and prices reflect that premium. 

So in this case, the more compact modular data center build has some distinct advantages. The less real estate you need, the less initial costs will be to purchase (or lease) space for the data center. This also has an impact on another factor: the cost of the build. 

Building Costs

Constructing a modular data center is much cheaper than constructing a traditional one, effectively 30% less. That is a huge number when you talk about initial costs. Combined with the lower cost of real estate, deploying a modular data center is much more efficient for those looking towards hyperscaling and co-location. 

This has been shown to be especially true as more “work from anywhere” options become available, and the need for high-speed data center capacity shifts from city centers and similar areas to residential and suburban ones.  

This leads us to our next advantage:

Deployment Speed

The time needed to construct a traditional data center is much greater than that needed to deploy a modular data center. The average data center takes 18-24 months from start to finish, but you can save around 30% of that time by going the modular data center route.

In part, this is because you avoid traditional construction delays due to bad weather, seasonal construction, and more.  

This is not to say modular deployment is better – it is simply faster. It could be argued that a traditional build will last longer and the overall construction will be of higher quality, but that is not always the case. Many modular data centers are created with a similar lifespan in mind and can last just as long as a traditional build.

So which one is better?

The bottom line when it comes to which one is better, a modular or traditional data center build, the answer is, it depends. Ask these questions:

  • How urgent is the need for this data center? 
  • Where will the data center be located? What is the costs associated with a greater holding of real estate?
  • What is the purpose of this data center? Is the need for moves and changes anticipated?
  • What kind of security is needed, and what is possible in the data center location?
  • What is the long-term plan for this data center?

The answers in your situation may vary, but as much as the traditional data center is not dead, the modular data center is on the rise, and for many situations, it’s the best option. 

No matter whether you are creating a modular data center or doing a traditional build, your rack and cable management matter, as does your labeling system and your physical layer security. At AnD Cable Products, we can help with all of these things. Give us a call today, tell us about your situation, and we’d be happy to have a conversation about how we can help

We’re here for all of your data center needs. 

Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control

A150 Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control System Brochure

Full visibility, network security and control of your physical layer environment. Monitor your entire hybrid cloud and IT infrastructure from a cloud-based, integrated dashboard:

  • Introducing the A150 System
  • A150 System Architecture – High-Level Overview
  • A150 System Features
  • System Controller Hardware and Specifications
  • Monitoring Controllers, Probes and Sensors

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

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4 Steps to Prepare Your Data Center for Net Zero Carbon Emissions

4 Steps to Prepare Your Data Center for Net Zero Carbon Emissions - AnD Cable Management Blog

The race to net zero carbon emissions is on – our economy and our world depend on it. The data center industry, one that tends to gobble up lots of power is at the forefront of a number of initiatives being implemented around the world. How will you prepare your data center for net zero carbon emissions? Here’s 4 steps that will get you started.

Jump to Section:

4 Steps to Prepare Your Data Center for Net Zero Carbon Emissions - AnD Cable Management Blog

The Situation Now

Data centers first became the focus of Greenpeace and other groups back in the mid-to-early 2010 boom. The focus at that time was on enterprise-level data centers – the big guys, in other words. The fact that data centers used lots of power became evident and so the move toward minimizing that impact grew in both urgency and popularity.

So much so that the position of Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO) grew to overtake the emerging position of Chief Security Officers. Those in charge of cybersecurity ended up having to change their title to CISO (Chief Information Security Officer) because CSO had already been widely recognized.

Since then, smaller edge computing data centers have become the new focus. With COVID hastening the transition, today, cloud computing, AI, remote monitoring and other data center management trends have now established a level of control and sustainability not previously thought possible.

Thanks in part to these technological developments, net zero carbon emissions now feels more achievable and less like the plot-line in a futuristic sci-fi flick. So, in what areas of the data center can emissions be reduced?

Step One – Make a Commitment

There are several individual measures that promote sustainability. The key is to take all of those individual components and standards and work them into an ecosystem that supports your emissions goal.

Companies and countries alike are making a commitment to reducing carbon emissions as a part of their brand. However, words are not enough, and these companies – including the largest hyperscaling data center companies in the world – are taking action. Advances are happening quickly in the area of artificial intelligence (AI), remote management and data center design. Being on the leading edge of these developments shows that your data center is part of this commitment to a “greener cloud infrastructure.”

Like most strategies, it’s only once a firm commitment at the top of the organization has been made that the necessary actions can be taken, including providing leaders with the authority to make decisions that align with the goal and that resources, responsibilities and accountabilities are allocated.

Step Two – Use Sustainable Energy Sources

Solar, wind and even hydroelectric power are all sustainable sources of power that can make dependence on coal and other carbon-intense fuels a thing of the past. Companies like Tesla and Microsoft are testing and deploying battery technology that can run data centers longer than ever before, even with no sun or wind available.

This means only using the local grid as your primary power source if sustainable energy is available 24+7. Otherwise, the data center will need to provide at least some sustainable sources of its own, like a solar or wind farm designed to directly support a data center.

Because this is expensive, only the largest, hyperscale companies with large data centers can be 100% self-sufficient. Hybrid solutions could help to bridge the gap, such as supplementing local power supplies with solar and wind on site. Selecting a site that’s close to a local, sustainable power grid should be a factor in choosing where to locate your data center and will support the goal of net zero carbon emissions.

Step Three – Operate at Peak Efficiency

For data centers, not only should your power be sourced responsibly, but your data center needs to operate efficiently. One way to reduce carbon dependency is to simply use less power. Strategies can include initiatives such as pro-active device monitoring to identify ‘Zombie Servers’ – stacks that contribute little to performance, but still use significant resources to maintain.

The efficient and responsible use of power, as covered by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 12, is about Responsible Production and Consumption. Some other standards include:

  • PUE (Power Use Effectiveness) – Determined by dividing the power coming into the data center by the power used by the computer infrastructure.
  • LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) – A green building certification program that rates building design
  • PAR4 – A new form of power measurement that accurately measures IT equipment power usage to help optimally plan for capacity.
  • ASHRAE (The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) – Standards for the temperature and humidity operating ranges for IT equipment and data centers.
  • CCF (Cooling Capacity Factor) – CCF is a metric used to evaluate rated cooling capacity against how that capacity is actually used.

These standards are just a few of those used to rate the efficiency of a data center and are designed to help data centers move toward net zero through more effective use of the power they have available.

Step Four – Build-in Resilience and Agility

The real job of a data center is uptime. Yes, customers want a green data center that is moving toward, if not already achieving, net zero emissions. However, at the same time, they expect that there will be no reduction in service. They expect full uptime, speed, and data protection.

This means that systems must not only be green, but must be reliable and include redundancies, power backups, and other protections, including cybersecurity and physical layer security to protect both customer assets and their data.

The good news is that not only is clean energy better for the environment, but it is also more reliable in many cases, allowing data centers to keep uptime near 99.999% standards. This is a balance that sustainable data centers must constantly monitor, adjust to and plan for.

Net zero carbon emissions is the standard of the future. Your data center can prepare now. Use clean energy, and plan to scale with that energy use in mind. Use the energy you have efficiently and plan for resiliency as part of your transition strategy. It’s what clients and customers and the world deserves.

Have questions about optimizing your physical layer, monitoring and remote control or ways to use your floor space efficiently? Contact Us at AnD Cable Products. We’re here to help.

Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control

A150 Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control System Brochure

Full visibility, network security and control of your physical layer environment. Monitor your entire hybrid cloud and IT infrastructure from a cloud-based, integrated dashboard:

  • Introducing the A150 System
  • A150 System Architecture – High-Level Overview
  • A150 System Features
  • System Controller Hardware and Specifications
  • Monitoring Controllers, Probes and Sensors

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/

Posted on 1 Comment

8 Critical Data Center Practices for Floor Design and Delivery

Woman Drawing Data Center Floor Plan Designs on Glass Wall

The physical layer of the internet, the data center, is largely dependent on floor plans, not only the floor design and type of the floor itself, but where you put everything, and how that impacts data accessibility and delivery for your clients.

Perhaps the most important feature of any data center is agility and flexibility. To prepare for the future, floor plans must have the ability to adapt built-in. How do we get there?

Jump to Section:

  1. Density and Capacity
  2. Prepping for Future Architecture and Changes
  3. Storage and Cooling
  4. Building Management Systems
  5. Built-in Redundancy
  6. Remote Management
  7. Physical Layer Security
  8. Using Renewable Energy
Woman Drawing Data Center Floor Plan Designs
To prepare for the future, data center floor plans must have the ability to adapt built-in

1. Density and Capacity

First, we must think in terms of both density and capacity: there is always a tradeoff between power and space. A denser server system will require a more sophisticated power and cooling strategy, which may in the long run be more costly per watt than a less aggressive approach.

The most common answer is a blend of both high and low-density rack layouts to get the maximum benefits of each. Modular density allows for the addition of capacity over time and with energy costs higher than the cost of space (at least currently) a less dense approach makes more sense for most applications and data center floor designs.

2. Prepping for Future Architecture and Changes

This brings us nicely to the next point. Server configurations are constantly changing, and likely will continue to do so going forward. Balancing density and capacity when it comes to data center floor design makes it easier to make moves and changes when the need arises.

A forward-thinking floor design simply means you are ready when whatever technology is next taking over the market. Think of how your current layout can be adapted to new forms and layouts.

3. Storage and Cooling

This naturally leads to storage and cooling, which is directly related to density and capacity, and future thinking. You must consider how you will store data, what kind of servers and racks you will use, and even where you will source them and other materials.

A part of that will also be your cooling plan. How will you cool your systems? Will you have an underfloor wiring plan or an overhead one? What kind of floor will you have? What will your HVAC system look like, and how will access to the building be controlled? This is all something to think about while looking at your floor designs.

4. Building Management Systems

What does your building management system look like, and how well does it meet your data center needs. There are several aspects to consider, including your maintenance services

  • Generators
  • UPS Batteries and backups
  • Electrical supply infrastructure
  • Mechanical systems maintenance

All these various pieces require various levels of maintenance, and physical accessibility must be a consideration. This also leads to our next point.

5. Built-in Redundancy

When maintenance occurs or disaster strikes, redundant systems need to be in place to keep the stellar uptime customers demand. This must be a part of your data center floor design from the start. This is a part of not only data center service, but physical and data layer security as well.

6. Remote Management

If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s that people can do many things remotely in an amazing way. While remote monitoring and even management of data centers have been possible for quite some time, the pandemic propelled it to a mainstream priority. Any data center design conceived going forward must be structured to enable remote monitoring and management.

This goes relates to everything, from building management systems to server management systems. Sensors can detect when something is wrong, in many cases take action to correct the issue, and inform human data center management of the issues, so that permanent corrections can be implemented.

7. Physical Layer Security

Of course, a part of remote management leads to physical layer network security. This includes everything from digital locks for entrances with biometric security in place to door alarms, AI monitoring of camera systems, and more.

These systems are far better than an on-premises security team, can be monitored from anywhere, and both managers and if necessary the appropriate authorities can be notified of any incident requiring attention.

8. Using Renewable Energy

Finally, an important part of data center management and development going forward is the use of renewable energy. While this does not always impact the physical layout of the interior of your data center, it may impact your power and electrical configurations, the redundancies you need to have built into your data center, and the area you have to expand the physical footprint of your data center going forward.

A big part of your data center floor design and how you arrange both high and low-density areas of the data center is related to the server racks, cable management products, and physical layer security systems you choose.

At AnD Cable Products, we can make sure you have everything you need to set things up properly from the start or to make moves and changes as you need to. Contact Us today! We’d love to discuss your data center needs.

Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control

A150 Physical Layer Environment Network Security Monitoring and Control System Brochure

Full visibility, network security and control of your physical layer environment. Monitor your entire hybrid cloud and IT infrastructure from a cloud-based, integrated dashboard:

  • Introducing the A150 System
  • A150 System Architecture – High-Level Overview
  • A150 System Features
  • System Controller Hardware and Specifications
  • Monitoring Controllers, Probes and Sensors

About the Author

Louis Chompff - Founder, AnD Cable Products, Rack and Cable ManagementLouis Chompff, Founder & Managing Director, AnD Cable Products
Louis established AnD Cable Products – Intelligently Designed Cable Management in 1989. Prior to this he enjoyed a 20+ year career with a leading global telecommunications company in a variety of senior data management positions. Louis is an enthusiastic inventor who designed, patented and brought to market his innovative Zero U cable management racks and Unitag cabel labels, both of which have become industry-leading network cable management products. AnD Cable Products only offer products that are intelligently designed, increase efficiency, are durable and reliable, re-usable, easy to use or reduce equipment costs. He is the principal author of the Cable Management Blog, where you can find network cable management ideas, server rack cabling techniques and space saving tips, data center trends, latest innovations and more.
Visit https://andcable.com or shop online https://andcable.com/shop/